Buck meaning

bŭk
(US, dated, derogatory) A black or Native American man.
noun
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3
To buck is to resist or to move forward in a jerking motion.

An example of buck is to resist the system's usual routine.

An example of buck is the motion of a animal when it is trying to throw off a rider.

verb
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3
A young buck; an adventurous, impetuous, dashing, or high-spirited young man.
noun
4
1
(US, slang) One hundred.

The police caught me driving a buck-forty on the freeway.

That skinny guy? C'mon, he can't weigh more than a buck and a quarter.

noun
4
1
1825, Constantine Henry Phipps, I Zingari, The English in Italy, Volume II, page 153,

The Captain was then a buck and dandy, during the reign of those two successive dynasties, of the first rank of the second order ; the characteristic of which very respectable rank of fashionables I hold to be, that their spurs impinge upon the pavement oftener than upon the sides of a horse.

noun
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2
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(dated) An object of various types, placed on a table to indicate turn or status; such as a brass object, placed in rotation on a US Navy wardroom dining table to indicate which officer is to be served first, or an item passed around a poker table indicating the dealer or placed in the pot to remind the winner of some privilege or obligation when his or her turn to deal next comes.
noun
3
1
(US, in certain metaphors or phrases) Blame; responsibility; scapegoating; finger-pointing.

Pass the buck; the buck stops here.

noun
3
1
(Australia, US, informal) A dollar (one hundred cents).

Can I borrow five bucks?

noun
3
2
(UK, dialect) The body of a post mill, particularly in East Anglia. See Windmill machinery.
noun
2
1
(Scotland) The beech tree.

noun
2
1
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(person) (born Pearl Sydenstricker) 1892-1973; U.S. novelist.
proper name
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0
To wash (clothes) in lye or suds, or, in later usage, by beating them on stones in running water.
verb
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0
(mining) To break up or pulverize, as ores.
verb
1
0
The definition of a buck is slang for a dollar, or an adult male animal, often with antlers.

An example of a buck is a dollar.

An example of a buck is a male deer.

noun
1
1
(offensive) A Native American or black man.
noun
1
1
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To make sudden jerky movements; jolt.

The motor bucked and lurched before it finally ran smoothly.

verb
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1
(informal) To strive with determination.

Bucking for a promotion.

verb
1
1
A sawhorse or sawbuck.
noun
1
1
A leather-covered frame used for gymnastic vaulting.
noun
1
1
A male deer, antelope, sheep, goat, rabbit, hare, and sometimes the male of other animals such as the ferret and shad.
noun
1
1
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(US) An uncastrated sheep, a ram.
noun
1
1
(South Africa, informal) A rand (currency unit).
noun
1
1
(finance, jargon) One million dollars.
noun
1
1
(informal) A euro.
noun
1
1
A frame on which firewood is sawed; a sawhorse; a sawbuck.
noun
1
1
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(intransitive) To copulate, as bucks and does.
verb
1
1
(intransitive) To bend; buckle.
verb
1
1
(intransitive, of a horse or similar saddle or pack animal) To leap upward arching its back, coming down with head low and forelegs stiff, forcefully kicking its hind legs upward, often in an attempt to dislodge or throw a rider or pack.
verb
1
1
(military) To subject to a mode of punishment which consists of tying the wrists together, passing the arms over the bent knees, and putting a stick across the arms and in the angle formed by the knees.
verb
1
1
(intransitive, by extension) To resist obstinately; oppose or object strongly.

The vice president bucked at the board's latest solution.

verb
1
1
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(intransitive, by extension) To move or operate in a sharp, jerking, or uneven manner.

The motor bucked and sputtered before dying completely.

verb
1
1
(by extension) To overcome or shed (e.g., an impediment or expectation), in pursuit of a goal; to force a way through despite (an obstacle); to resist or proceed against.

The plane bucked a strong headwind.

Our managers have to learn to buck the trend and do the right thing for their employees.

John is really bucking the odds on that risky business venture. He's doing quite well.

verb
1
1
(riveting) To press a reinforcing device (bucking bar) against (the force of a rivet) in order to absorb vibration and increase expansion. See Rivet:Installation.
verb
1
1
(forestry) To saw a felled tree into shorter lengths, as for firewood.
verb
1
1
Lye or suds in which cloth is soaked in the operation of bleaching, or in which clothes are washed.
noun
1
1
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The cloth or clothes soaked or washed.

noun
1
1
To soak, steep or boil in lye or suds, as part of the bleaching process.
verb
1
1
(of a horse or similar saddle or pack animal) To throw (a rider or pack) by bucking.
verb
1
2
An act or instance of bucking.

A horse that unseated its rider on the first buck.

noun
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0
To leap upward arching the back.

The horse bucked in fright.

verb
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To charge with the head lowered; butt.
verb
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To resist stubbornly and obstinately; balk.
verb
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To throw or toss by bucking.

Buck off a rider; bucked the packsaddle off its back.

verb
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To oppose directly and stubbornly; go against.
verb
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0
(football) To charge into (an opponent's line) carrying the ball.
verb
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To butt against with the head.
verb
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Of the lowest rank in a specified military category.

A buck private; a buck sergeant.

adjective
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A dollar.
noun
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An amount of money.

Working overtime to make an extra buck.

noun
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(games) A counter or marker formerly passed from one poker player to another to indicate an obligation, especially one's turn to deal.
noun
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(informal) Obligation to account for something; responsibility.

Tried to pass the buck for the failure to his boss.

noun
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To pass (a task or duty) to another, especially so as to avoid responsibility.
verb
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A male deer, antelope, goat, rabbit, etc.
noun
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The act of bucking.
noun
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(informal) A young man, esp. one who is bold, lively, vigorous, etc.
noun
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(archaic) A fop or dandy.
noun
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To rear upward quickly and descend with the back arched and forelegs stiff, as in an attempt to throw off a rider.
verb
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To plunge forward with lowered head, as a goat.
verb
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(informal) To resist something as if plunging against it.
verb
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(informal) To move jerkily.
verb
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To dislodge or throw by bucking.
verb
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(informal) To resist stubbornly.
verb
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Male.
adjective
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Of the lowest military rating.

Buck private, buck sergeant.

adjective
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(now rare) A sawbuck; sawhorse.
noun
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A small gymnastics horse used especially for training.
noun
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(historical, poker) A counter placed before a player as a reminder to deal next, etc.
noun
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0
(slang) A dollar.
noun
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Completely; stark.

Buck naked.

adverb
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A slang term used to refer to one U.S. dollar; in traders’ jargon, $1 million.
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(informal) the buck stops here
  • The ultimate responsibility rests here.
idiom
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buck for
  • to work eagerly or too eagerly for (a promotion, etc.)
idiom
0
0
buck up
  • to cheer up
idiom
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0
pass the buck
  • to evade blame or responsibility by trying to pass it to someone else
idiom
0
0
the buck stops here
  • the responsibility cannot be shifted to someone else or evaded (by someone)
idiom
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0

Origin of buck

  • Alteration (influenced by buck) of Dutch bok male goat, trestle from Middle Dutch boc

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English bukke from Old English buc male deer, bucca male goat

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Short for buckhorn knife (from its use as a marker in poker)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Short for buckskin (from its use in trade)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle Low German bucken (“to bend”) or Middle Dutch bucken, bocken (“to bend”), intensive forms of Old Saxon būgan and Old Dutch *būgan (“to bend, bow”), from Proto-Germanic *būganą (“to bend”), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰūgʰ- (“to bend”). Cognate with German bücken (“to bend, stoop”), Danish bukke (“to buck”), Swedish bocka (“to bend, buck, bow”). In fluenced in some senses by buck (“male goat”). See above. Cf. bow.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English buc, bucke, bukke, from Old English buc, bucc, bucca (“he-goat, stag”), from Proto-Germanic *bukkaz, *bukkô (“buck”) (compare West Frisian bok (“he-goat”), German Bock), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰug- (“ram”) (compare Albanian buzë, Old Armenian բուծ (buc, “sucking lamb”), Persian بز (boz, “goat”), Sanskrit बुख (bukha)).

    From Wiktionary

  • See beech.

    From Wiktionary