Bull meaning

bo͝ol
A police officer or detective.
noun
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The definition of a bull is an uncastrated male bovine animal, or is slang for nonsensical and untrue talk.

An example of a bull is a male ox.

An example of bull is talk that is made up of meaningless lies.

noun
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To push; force.
verb
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To push ahead or through forcefully.
verb
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Male.
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Large and strong like a bull.
adjective
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Characterized by rising prices.

A bull market.

adjective
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An official document issued by the pope and sealed with a bulla.
noun
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The bulla used to seal such a document.
noun
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A gross blunder in logical speech or expression.
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The adult male of certain other large animals, as the elephant, elk, moose, walrus, whale, etc.
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An investor who buys stocks, commodities, etc. in the belief their price will rise.
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A person regarded as like a bull in size, strength, etc.
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A bulldog.
noun
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A policeman or detective.
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noun
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To make (one's way) with driving force.
verb
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To bluff, as with insincere talk.
verb
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To talk foolishly, insincerely, etc.
verb
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Male.
adjective
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Like a bull in size, strength, etc.
adjective
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Rising in price.

A bull market.

adjective
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noun
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An official document, edict, or decree, esp. one from the pope.
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A ludicrously illogical or incongruous mistake in statement (Ex.: I'm glad I hate onions because if I liked onions, I'd eat them, and I can't stand onions)
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Bulletin.
abbreviation
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Of a bull or bulls.

Bullfight.

affix
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Like a bull or bull's.

Bullhead.

affix
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Large or male.

Bullfrog.

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(Bull Worldwide Information Systems, Billerica, MA, Group Bull, Paris, France, www.bull.com) A computer and information services company with offices in more than 100 countries. A leading advocate of open source software, Bull offers Intel-based servers running the GCOS operating system and PowerPC-based servers running AIX. One of its business units provides a complete line of networked storage products, while its Trustway appliance products are known for their open source security options for VPNs.Bull was founded in France in 1933 and named after Norwegian engineer Fredrik Rosing Bull. Bull had created a revolutionary adding-sorting punch card machine in 1921, and his patents were purchased by the company. In the 1960s, Bull partnered with GE in computer development in France. When Honeywell took over GE's computer business in 1970, its French division became Honeywell Bull. In 1987, Honeywell turned all its computer business over to Bull. For a while, both Honeywell and NEC had ownership in the company, which was named Bull HN. Today, all operations, with particular focus in the manufacturing, banking, finance, and telecom sectors, are under the Bull name. See Honeywell.
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Someone who believes that the market will rise. Contrasts with a bear, who believes the opposite. See also bull market.
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An adult male of domesticated cattle or oxen.
  • Specifically, one that is uncastrated.
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An adult male of certain large mammals, such as whales, elephants and seals.
noun
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A large, strong man.
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(finance) An investor who buys (commodities or securities) in anticipation of a rise in prices.
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(slang) A policeman.
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(slang, Philadelphia) A male person.
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Large and strong, like a bull.
adjective
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Of large mammals, male.

A bull elephant.

adjective
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(finance) Of a market in which prices are rising (compare bear)
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(intransitive) To force oneself (in a particular direction).

He bulled his way in.

verb
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(intransitive) To lie, to tell untruths.
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(intransitive) To be in heat; to manifest sexual desire as cows do.
verb
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(UK, military) To polish boots to a high shine.
verb
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(finance) To endeavour to raise the market price of.

To bull railroad bonds.

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(finance) To endeavour to raise prices in.

To bull the market.

verb
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A papal bull, an official document or edict from the Pope.
noun
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A seal affixed to a document, especially a document from the Pope.
noun
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(dated, 17th century) To publish in a Papal bull.
verb
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A lie.
noun
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(euphemistic, informal) Nonsense.
noun
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To mock, cheat.
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(16th century, obsolete) A bubble.
noun
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A botanical plant name author abbreviation for botanist Jean Baptiste François Bulliard (1752-1793).
pronoun
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An exceptionally large, strong, and aggressive person.
noun
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The adult male of any bovine animal, as the ox, buffalo, etc.
noun
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grab
  • To deal with a problem directly and resolutely.
idiom
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shoot the bull
  • To talk idly.
idiom
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take the bull by the horns
  • To deal boldly with a danger or difficulty.
idiom
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the Bull
  • Taurus, the constellation and second sign of the zodiac.
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of bull

  • From Webster's New World College Dictionary, 5th Edition
  • Middle English bule from Old English bula probably from Old Norse boli bhel-2 in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Middle English bulle from Old French from Medieval Latin bulla bulla
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Origin unknown
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English bul, bule, from Old English bula (“bull, steer”), from Proto-Germanic *bulô ("bull"; compare West Frisian bolle, Dutch bul, German Bulle, Old Norse boli), from Proto-Indo-European *bhl̥no (compare Old Irish ball (“limb”), Latin follis (“bellows, leather bag”), Thracian βόλινθος (bólinthos, “wild bull”), Albanian "buall" (bull) or related bolle (“testicles”), Ancient Greek φαλλός (phallós, “penis”)), from Proto-Indo-European *bhel (“to blow”). More at blow.
    From Wiktionary
  • From Middle English bull (“falsehood”), of unknown origin. Possibly related to Old French boul, boule, fraud, deceit, trickery. Popularly associated with bullshit.
    From Wiktionary
  • From Old French boule (“ball”), from Latin bulla (“round swelling”), from Proto-Indo-European *bhel (“to blow, to swell”).
    From Wiktionary
  • From Middle English bulle, from Old French bulle, from Low Latin bulla
    From Wiktionary