Dollar meaning

dŏlər
Frequency:
A coin or note that is worth one dollar.
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The basic monetary unit of the U.S., equal to 100 cents.
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A Spanish coin (piece of eight) used in American Revolutionary times.
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The Mexican peso.
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Any of the standard monetary units of various other countries, as of Australia, Barbados, and Canada.
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A coin or piece of paper money of the value of a dollar.
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Official designation for currency in some parts of the world, including Canada, Australia, the United States, Hong Kong, and elsewhere. Its symbol is $.
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(by extension) Money generally.
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Colloquially in the United Kingdom, a quarter of a pound or one crown, historically minted as a coin of approximately the same size and composition as a then-contemporary dollar coin of the United States, and worth slightly more.
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(historical) Imported from the United States, and paid for in U.S. dollars. (Note: distinguish "dollar wheat", North American farmers' slogan, meaning a market price of one dollar per bushel.)
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The currency unit of the United States, comprised of 100 cents. Traders shorten it to USD. The U.S. dollar is the world’s most frequently used currency in business transactions. Even transactions not involving a U.S. party often are cited in dollars. The dollar is also the name for the currency unit of Antigua, Australia, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Brunei, Canada, Dominica, Fiji, Grenada, Guyana, Hong Kong, Jamaica, Liberia, Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Namibia, Nauru, New Zealand, Palau, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Taiwan, Turk and Caicos, Trinidad and Tobago, Tuvalu, and Zimbabwe.
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Origin of dollar

  • Low German daler taler from German Taler short for Joachimstaler after Joachimstal (Jáchymov), a town of northwest Czech Republic where similar coins were first minted

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Attested since about 1500, from early Dutch daler, daalder, from German Taler, Thaler (“dollar”), from Sankt Joachimsthaler, coins minted in the Saint Joachim valley (Tal is German for "valley").

    From Wiktionary