Bill meaning

bĭl
To enter on a statement of costs or on a particularized list.
verb
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To present a statement of charges to.
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(UK, slang) A nickname for the British constabulary. Often called "The Bill" or "Old Bill"
pronoun
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To present a statement of costs or charges to.
verb
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A statement, usually itemized, of charges for goods or services; invoice.
noun
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Somebody armed with a bill; a billman.

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The visor of a cap.
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The tip of the fluke of an anchor.
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To touch beaks together.
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A billhook.
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A halberd or similar weapon with a hooked blade and a long handle.
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A statement or list, as a menu, theater program, ship's roster, etc.
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A poster or handbill, esp. one announcing a circus, show, etc.
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The entertainment offered in a theater.
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A draft of a law proposed to a lawmaking body.
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A bill of exchange.
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Any promissory note.
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A written document, esp. one with a seal.
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A written declaration of charges or complaints filed in a legal action.
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To make out a bill of (items); list.
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To post bills or placards throughout (a town, etc.)
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To book for shipping.
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A beaklike mouth part, as of a turtle.
noun
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The point of an anchor fluke.
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The peak, or visor, of a cap.
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To touch bills together.
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To caress someone lovingly.
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A medieval weapon having a hook-shaped blade with a spike at the back, mounted on a long staff.
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A masculine name.
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A draft of a proposed statute submitted to a legislature by one of its members for consideration and possible enactment.
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A bill that, if enacted, would authorize the expenditure of government funds.
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The draft of a bill as it is adopted by one house of a legislature and before it is sent to the other house for consideration. See also enrolled bill.
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The final draft of a bill after it is adopted by both houses of a legislature, printed, checked for errors, and signed by the presiding officers of both houses before it is sent to the president or a governor for approval or rejection. See also engrossed bill.
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A bill that contains proposals on a variety of subjects. Usually, such a bill will have one major provision dealing with one topic and several minor provisions regarding matters unrelated to the major subject.
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A bill that contains all proposals on a single (usually broad) subject, such as an omnibus education bill that includes all proposals regarding, however tangentially, the subject of education.
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A bill concerning the interests, or affecting, only one or a small number of individuals, entities, or localities.
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A bill concerning the general interests of, or affecting, the whole community, state, or country.
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The words used in a grand jury’s notation on a bill of indictment indicating that insufficient evidence exists to support a criminal charge set forth in the proposed indictment. Such a decision by the grand jury prevents the prosecution from pursuing a criminal action against the defendant based on those charges until a new grand jury is selected.
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A piece of legislation for the purpose of levying taxes. By the United States Constitution, all federal revenue bills must originate in the House of Representatives. A similar provision constraining the origin of revenue bills to one particular house of the state legislature is part of many of the various state constitutions.
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The words used in a grand jury’s notation on a bill of indictment indicating that sufficient evidence exists to support a criminal charge set forth in the proposed indictment that, if proved, would result in the defendant’s conviction. Once the bill of indictment is indorsed as a true bill and filed with the court, the prosecution must pursue a criminal action against the defendant based on those charges unless the court approves a dismissal.
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Any of various bladed or pointed hand weapons, originally designating an Anglo-Saxon sword, and later a weapon of infantry, especially in the 14th and 15th centuries, commonly consisting of a broad, heavy, double-edged, hook-shaped blade, with a short pike at the back and another at the top, attached to the end of a long staff.
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A cutting instrument, with hook-shaped point, and fitted with a handle, used in pruning, etc.; a billhook.
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(nautical) The extremity of the arm of an anchor; the point of or beyond the fluke.
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To dig, chop, etc., with a bill.
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The beak of a bird, especially when small or flattish; sometimes also used with reference to a turtle, platypus, or other animal.
noun
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A beak-like projection, especially a promontory.
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To stroke bill against bill, with reference to doves; to caress in fondness.
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(US) A piece of paper money; a banknote.
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A written note of goods sold, services rendered, or work done, with the price or charge; an invoice.
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A paper, written or printed, and posted up or given away, to advertise something, as a lecture, a play, or the sale of goods; a placard; a poster; a handbill.
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A writing binding the signer or signers to pay a certain sum at a future day or on demand, with or without interest, as may be stated in the document. A bill of exchange. In the United States, it is usually called a note, a note of hand, or a promissory note.
noun
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To advertise by a bill or public notice.
verb
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To charge; to send a bill to.
verb
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The bell, or boom, of the bittern.
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A diminutive of the male given name William.
pronoun
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(US, slang) One Hundred Dollars.
pronoun
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The definition of a bill is a beak or beak-like part of an animal.

An example of bill is a duck's mouth.

noun
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Bill is defined as a statement of fees or charges, or a list of what's available or offered.

An example of bill is a list of prices for cleaning clothes dropped at a dry cleaners.

An example of bill is a poster outside of a theater showing who's performing.

noun
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An itemized list or statement of fees or charges.
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A statement or list of particulars, such as a theater program or menu.
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The entertainment offered by a theater.
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A public notice, such as an advertising poster.
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bill and coo
  • To kiss or caress and murmur endearments.
idiom
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fill the bill
  • To meet the requirements.
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of bill

  • Middle English bille from Norman French from Medieval Latin billa alteration of bulla seal on a document from Latin bubble
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Middle English bil from Old English bill
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Middle English from Old English bile
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Anglo-Norman bille, from Old French bulle, from Medieval Latin bulla (“seal", "sealed document”). Compare bull.
    From Wiktionary
  • Old English bil, from West Germanic. Cognate with German Bille (“axe”) and Dutch bijl (“axe”).
    From Wiktionary
  • Old English bile, of unknown origin.
    From Wiktionary