Trap meaning

trăp
To trap is defined as to catch someone or something.

When you capture an animal and he is unable to leave, this is an example of a situation where you trap an animal.

When you set up a situation to catch someone in a lie, this is an example of a situation where you trap the person in his own lie.

When the water in a pipe prevents the escape of offensive sewer gas odors, this is an example of how you trap odors.

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The human mouth.
noun
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An ornamental covering for a horse.
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The definition of a trap is something designed to catch a person or animal, either figuratively or literally.

When a piece of cheese is set out to attract a mouse and then a wire snaps down to capture the mouse, this is an example of a trap.

When a plan is hatched to catch someone in wrongdoing, this is an example of a trap.

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A contrivance for catching and holding animals, as a concealed pit or a clamplike device that springs shut suddenly.
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A stratagem for catching or tricking an unwary person.
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A confining or undesirable circumstance from which escape or relief is difficult.

Fell into poverty's trap.

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A device for sealing a passage against the escape of gases, especially a U-shaped or S-shaped bend in a drainpipe that prevents the return flow of sewer gas by means of a water barrier.
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A running play in which the ball carrier advances through a hole in the defensive line created by allowing a defensive lineman to penetrate the backfield.
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A light two-wheeled carriage with springs.
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A trapdoor.
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Percussion instruments, such as snare drums and cymbals, especially in a jazz band.
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To catch in a trap; ensnare.
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To prevent from escaping or getting free.

Was trapped in the locked attic.

verb
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To deceive or trick by means of a scheme or plan.
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To seal off (gases) by a trap.
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To furnish with traps or a trap.
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To set traps for game.
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To engage in trapping furbearing animals.
verb
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Personal belongings or household goods.
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To furnish with trappings.
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Any of several dark, fine-grained igneous rocks often used in making roads.
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Any device for catching animals, as one that snaps shut tightly when stepped on, or a pitfall; gin, snare, etc.
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Any stratagem or ambush designed to catch or trick unsuspecting persons.
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Any of various devices for preventing the escape of gas, offensive odors, etc.; specif., a U-shaped or S-shaped part of a drainpipe, in which standing water seals off sewer gas.
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An apparatus for throwing disks into the air to be shot at in trapshooting.
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A light, two-wheeled carriage with springs.
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A set of drums together with various other percussion instruments, as cymbals and woodblocks, played by one person as in a jazz or dance band.
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The mouth, specif. as the organ of speech.
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To catch in or as in a trap; entrap.
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To hold back or seal off by a trap.
verb
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To furnish with a trap or traps.
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To catch (a batted ball in baseball or a thrown ball in football) just as it rebounds from the ground rather than just before it strikes the ground.
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To set traps for game.
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To trap animals, esp. for their furs.
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Any of several dark-colored, usually fine-grained, extrusive igneous rocks; esp., such a rock, as basalt, used in road making.
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A geologic structure forming a reservoir enclosing an accumulation of oil or gas.
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To cover, equip, or adorn with trappings; caparison.
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A person's clothes, personal belongings, etc.
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To respond to a particular condition in a running program; for example, to "trap an interrupt" means to wait for a particular interrupt to occur and then redirect the computer to execute an appropriate routine. An "error trap" tests for an invalid set of data. It then displays the correct error message and bypasses processing that data. A "debugging trap" looks for the execution of a particular instruction in order to immediately stop the program and analyze the status of the system at that moment.
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A machine or other device designed to catch (sometimes kill) animals, either by holding them in a container, or by catching hold of part of the body.

I put down some traps in my apartment to try and deal with the mouse problem.

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A trick or arrangement designed to catch someone in a more general sense; a snare.

Unfortunately she fell into the trap of confusing biology with destiny.

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A covering over a hole or opening; a trapdoor.

Close the trap, would you, before someone falls and breaks their neck.

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A wooden instrument shaped somewhat like a shoe, used in the game of trapball; the game of trapball itself.
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Any device used to hold and suddenly release an object.

They shot out of the school gates like greyhounds out of the trap.

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A bend, sag, or other device in a waste-pipe arranged so that the liquid contents form a seal which prevents the escape of noxious gases, but permits the flow of liquids.
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A place in a water pipe, pump, etc., where air accumulates for want of an outlet.
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(historical) A light two-wheeled carriage with springs.
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(slang) A person's mouth.

Keep your trap shut.

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(in the plural) Belongings.
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(slang) Cubicle (in a public toilet)

I've just laid a cable in trap 2 so I'd give it 5 minutes if I were you.

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(slang) Short for trapezius muscle in bodybuilding.
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(sports) Short for trapshooting.
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(computing) An exception generated by the processor or by an external event.
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(Australia, slang, historical) A mining license inspector during the Australian gold rush.
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(US, slang, informal, African American Vernacular) A vehicle, residential building, or sidewalk corner where drugs are manufactured, packaged, or sold.
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(slang, informal, pejorative) A person with male genitalia who can be mistaken for a female; a convincing transvestite or transwoman.
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A kind of movable stepladder.

noun
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To physically capture, to catch in a trap or traps, or something like a trap.

To trap foxes.

verb
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To ensnare; to take by stratagem; to entrap.
verb
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To provide with a trap.

To trap a drain; to trap a sewer pipe.

verb
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(intransitive) To set traps for game; to make a business of trapping game; as, to trap for beaver.
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(intransitive) To leave suddenly, to flee.
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(US, slang, informal, African American Vernacular) (slang) (intransitive) To sell narcotics, especially in a public area.
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(computing, intransitive) To capture (e.g. an err) in order to handle or process it.
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A dark coloured igneous rock, now used to designate any non-volcanic, non-granitic igneous rock; trap rock.
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To dress with ornaments; to adorn; said especially of horses.
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Origin of trap

  • Middle English trap trapping perhaps alteration of Old French drap cloth from Late Latin drappus
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Swedish trapp from trappa step from Middle Low German trappe
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Middle English from Old English træppe
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Middle English trappe, from Old English træppe, treppe (“trap, snare”) (also in betræppan (“to trap”)) from Proto-Germanic *trap-. Akin to Old High German trappa, trapa (“trap, snare”), Middle Dutch trappe (“trap, snare”), Middle Low German treppe (“step, stair”) (German Treppe "step, stair"), Old English treppan (“to step, tread”) and possibly Albanian trap "raft, channel, path". Connection to "step" is "that upon which one steps". French trappe and Spanish trampa are ultimately borrowings from Germanic.
    From Wiktionary
  • Akin to Old English trappe (“trappings”), and perhaps from an Old French word of the same origin as English drab (“a kind of cloth”).
    From Wiktionary
  • From Swedish trapp, from trappa (“stair”).
    From Wiktionary