Ambush definition

ămbo͝osh
A sudden attack made from a concealed position.
noun
9
2
The act of concealing oneself and lying in wait to attack by surprise.
noun
4
0
To hide in ambush.
verb
4
2
The definition of an ambush is an area in which someone hid before attacking someone.

An example of an ambush is a trench in which soldiers are concealed before attacking.

noun
2
0
An ambush is defined as a surprise attack by someone, or something that was hidden.

An example of an ambush is an unexpected military raid of a house.

noun
2
1
Advertisement
Ambush means to attack by surprise.

An example of ambush is when soldiers from a Navy boat secretly empty onto a beach in the middle of the night in order to attack.

verb
1
0
Those hiding in order to attack by surprise.

The captain stationed an ambush near the harbor.

noun
0
0
The hiding place used for such an attack.
noun
0
0
To attack from a concealed position.
verb
0
0
A deployment of persons in hiding to make a surprise attack.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
The act of so lying in wait to attack.
noun
0
0
A surprise attack made by persons waiting in ambush.
noun
0
0
The persons in hiding.
noun
0
0
Their place of hiding.
noun
0
0
An attack launched from a concealed position.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
The troops posted in a concealed place, for attacking by surprise; those who lie in wait.
noun
0
0
To station in ambush with a view to surprise an enemy.
verb
0
0
To attack by ambush; to waylay.
verb
0
0
To attack from ambush.
verb
0
1

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
ambush
Plural:
ambushes

Origin of ambush

  • Middle English embushen to place in concealment among bushes, lay in wait from Old French embuschier from Frankish boscu bush, woods

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old French embusche (noun), embushier, embuissier (verb), from Old French em- + Vulgar Latin boscus, bosca, boscum (“wood”), from Frankish *boscu, *busk (“bush”), from Proto-Germanic *busk- (“bush, heavy stick”). Compare ambuscade. The change to am- from earlier forms in en- is unexplained. More at bush.

    From Wiktionary