Snare meaning

snâr
The definition of a snare is a tool for trapping something or a type of drum.

An example of a snare is a crab trap.

An example of a snare is a pipe drum.

noun
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A trapping device, often consisting of a noose, used for capturing birds and small mammals.
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To snare is defined as to catch or trap something.

An example of to snare is to catch a fish.

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A surgical instrument with a wire loop controlled by a mechanism in the handle, used to remove growths, such as tumors and polyps.
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To trap with or as if with a snare.
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To get hold or control of (something difficult to catch).

The fielder snared the ground ball.

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Any of the wires or cords stretched across the lower drumhead of a snare drum so as to vibrate against it.
noun
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A snare drum.
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A kind of trap for small animals, usually consisting of a noose which jerks tight upon the release of a spring trigger.
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Anything dangerous, risky, etc. that tempts or attracts; thing by which a person is entangled; trap.
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A wire noose for removing tumors, polyps, etc.
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To catch in a trap or snare.
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To tempt or attract into a situation, esp. one that is dangerous, risky, etc.
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A surgical instrument with a wire loop controlled by a mechanism in the handle, used to remove growths, such as tumors and polyps.
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A trap made from a loop of wire, string, or leather.
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(rare) A mental or psychological trap; usually in the phrase a snare and a delusion.
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(veterinary) A loop of cord used in obstetric cases, to hold or to pull a fetus from the mother animal.
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(music) A set of chains strung across the bottom of a drum to create a rattling sound.
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(music) A snare drum.
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To catch or hold, especially with a loop.
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Something that lures or entangles the unwary.

The snares of merchandisers; the snare of debt.

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Origin of snare

  • Middle English from Old English snearu and from Old Norse snara

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Probably from Dutch snaar string from Middle Dutch snāre

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Late Old English sneare, from Old Norse snara.

    From Wiktionary