Lure meaning

lo͝or
To lure is defined as to purposely attract someone or tempt someone to do something, often using a reward.

An example of lure is when you put out bait to try to get an animal to come to your trap.

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The definition of lure is something that attracts a person or animal, especially something used specifically for the purposes of attracting or baiting an animal.

An example of lure is a worm used to catch a fish.

An example of lure is a high paying job that attracts a person.

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A decoy used in catching animals, especially an artificial bait used in catching fish.
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A bunch of feathers attached to a long cord, used in falconry to recall the hawk.
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An attraction or appeal.

Living on the ocean has a lure for many retirees.

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To attract or entice, especially by wiles or temptation.

Customers were lured to the store by ads promising big discounts.

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To recall (a falcon) with a lure.
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A device consisting of a bunch of feathers on the end of a long cord, often baited with food: it is used in falconry to recall the hawk.
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A bait for animals; esp., an artificial one used in fishing.
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The power of attracting, tempting, or enticing.

The lure of the stage.

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Anything that so attracts or tempts.
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To recall (a falcon) with a lure.
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To attract, tempt, or entice.
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Something that tempts or attracts, especially one with a promise of reward or pleasure.

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(fishing) An artificial bait attached to a fishing line to attract fish.
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A bunch of feathers attached to a line, used in falconry to recall the hawk.

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To attract by temptation etc.; to entice.
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To recall a hawk with a lure.
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Something that tempts or attracts with the promise of pleasure or reward.

The lure of the open road.

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Origin of lure

Anglo-Norman lure, from Old French loirre (Modern French leurre), from Frankish lothr, from Proto-Germanic *lōþr-. Compare English allure, from Old French.