Shill meaning

shĭl
Frequency:
One who poses as a satisfied customer or an enthusiastic gambler to dupe bystanders into participating in a swindle.
noun
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The confederate of a gambler, pitchman, auctioneer, etc. who pretends to buy, bet, or bid so as to lure onlookers into participating.
noun
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An accomplice at a confidence trick during an auction or gambling game.
noun
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To act as a shill.
verb
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To act as a shill for (a deceitful enterprise).
verb
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To lure (a person) into a swindle.
verb
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A person who works energetically to sell or promote something.
noun
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To act or work as a shill.
verb
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A person paid to endorse a product favourably, while pretending to be impartial.
noun
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(pejorative) To promote or endorse in return for payment, especially dishonestly.
verb
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To put under cover; to sheal.
verb
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Origin of shill

  • Perhaps short for shillaber shill of unknown origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Unknown; attested as verb 1914, as noun 1916. Perhaps an abbreviation of shillaber, attested 1913. The word entered English via carny, originally denoting a carnival worker who pretends to be a member of the audience in an attempt to elicit interest in an attraction.

    From Wiktionary

  • There are some suggestions that it originates in the surname Shilaber or Shillibeer, especially George Shillibeer, but proposed origins are dubious as the word is first attested in North America in the 20th century, while proposed models are 19th century British.

    From Wiktionary

  • Speculatively cognate with German Schieber (“black marketeer, profiteer") via *shi-la-ber.

    From Wiktionary