Endorse meaning

ĭn-
Endorse is defined as to give your approval to someone or something or to authorize the payment of a document by signing with one's signature.

An example of endorse is Tiger Woods saying he drinks Gatorade.

An example of endorse is someone signing the back of a check made out to them before depositing it into their bank account.

verb
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To place (one's signature), as on a contract, to indicate approval of its contents or terms.
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To acknowledge (receipt of payment) by signing a bill, draft, or other instrument.
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To write one's signature on the back of (a check) to obtain the amount payable or to make the amount payable available to a third party or to the bearer.
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To write one's signature on the back of (an instrument) to transfer the rights available under that instrument to another party.
verb
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To write on the back of (a document)
  • To sign (one's name) as payee on the back of (a check, money order, etc.).
  • To make (a check, etc.) payable to another person by thus signing one's name and specifying the payee.
verb
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To write a note, title, etc. on (a document)
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To sign one’s name on a document, the back of a check, or another negotiable instrument. The signature serves as an authorization to follow the directions on the document.
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To support, to back, to give one's approval to, especially officially or by signature.
verb
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To write one's signature on the back of a cheque, or other negotiable instrument, when transferring it to a third party, or cashing it.
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To give an endorsement.
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(heraldry) A diminutive of the pale, usually appearing in pairs on either side of a pale.
noun
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Origin of endorse

  • Middle English endosen to sign (a document, originally by writing on its back), approve from Anglo-Norman endosser from Medieval Latin indorsāre Latin in- upon, in en–1 Latin dorsum back
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Alteration influenced by Medieval Latin indorsare of Middle English endosse, from Old French endosser (“to put on back”), from Latin dossum, alternative form of dorsum (“back”), from which also dorsal (“of the back”). That is, the ‘r’ was dropped in Latin dossum, which developed into Old French and then Middle English endosse, and then the ‘r’ was re-introduced into English via the Medieval Latin indorsare, which had retained the ‘r’. Note that the alternative spelling indorse also uses the initial ‘i’ from Latin (in-, rather than en-), but this form is now rare.
    From Wiktionary