Repel meaning

rĭ-pĕl
To repel is defined as to hold off, refuse to accept or reject.

An example of to repel is the way citronella keeps mosquitoes away.

An example of to repel is how sunlight drives away vampires.

verb
13
6
To offer resistance to; fight against.

Repel an invasion.

verb
9
4
To refuse to accept or submit to; reject.

A company that was trying to repel a hostile takeover.

verb
8
6
To refuse to accept (someone); spurn.
verb
7
5
To ward off or keep away; drive back.

Repel insects.

verb
5
7
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To drive off, or offer an opposing force to, something.
verb
2
1
To cause aversion or distaste in.

Your rudeness repels everyone.

verb
2
2
To be resistant to; be incapable of absorbing or mixing with.

Oil repels water.

verb
1
1
(physics) To present an opposing force to; push back or away from by a force.

Electric charges of the same sign repel one another.

verb
1
1
To offer a resistant force to something.
verb
1
1
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To cause aversion or distaste.

Behavior that repels.

verb
1
1
To refuse to accept, agree to, or submit to; reject.

To repel advances.

verb
1
1
To refuse to accept (a person); spurn.

To repel a suitor.

verb
1
1
To cause distaste, dislike, or aversion.
verb
1
1
(now rare) To turn (someone) away from a privilege, right, job, etc. [from 15th c.]
verb
1
1
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To reject, put off (a request, demand etc.). [from 15th c.]
verb
1
1
To ward off (a malignant influence, attack etc.). [from 15th c.]
verb
1
1
To drive back (an assailant, advancing force etc.). [from 15th c.]
verb
1
1
(physics) To force away by means of a repulsive force. [from 17th c.]
verb
1
1
To cause repulsion, cause dislike. [from 18th c.]
verb
1
1
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(sports) To save (a shot)
verb
1
1
To drive or force back; hold or ward off.

To repel an attack.

verb
1
2

Origin of repel

  • Middle English repellen from Old French repeller from Latin repellere re- re- pellere to drive pel-5 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English repellen, from Old French * repeller, from Latin repellere (“to drive back"), from re- (“back") + pellere (“to drive").

    From Wiktionary