Welcome meaning

wĕlkəm
Cordially or willingly permitted or invited.

You are welcome to join us.

adjective
16
4
Received with pleasure and hospitality into one's company or home.

A welcome guest.

adjective
8
2
Giving pleasure or satisfaction; agreeable or gratifying.

A welcome respite from hard work.

adjective
7
1
A cordial greeting or hospitable reception given to an arriving person.
noun
4
1
Used in the expression you're welcome to acknowledge an expression of gratitude.
adjective
4
3
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A reception upon arrival.

Gave the stranger an unfriendly welcome.

noun
3
1
Agreeable or gratifying.

Welcome news.

adjective
2
0
To greet with pleasure and hospitality.
verb
2
0
To greet, receive, or entertain (another or others) cordially or hospitably.
verb
1
0
To receive or accept gladly.

Would welcome a little privacy.

verb
1
0
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Used to greet cordially a visitor or recent arrival.
interjection
1
0
Gladly and cordially received.

A welcome guest.

adjective
1
0
Freely and willingly permitted or invited.

Welcome to use the family library.

adjective
1
0
Welcome is defined as to greet someone or accept something with pleasure or satisfaction.

An example of welcome is someone asking for feedback from attendees of an event.

verb
0
0
The definition of welcome is someone or something that is pleasant, invited or permitted.

An example of welcome is a guest who's been invited to someone's home.

adjective
0
0
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Welcome is the act of greeting someone.

An example of welcome is someone saying hello with a smile on their face.

noun
0
0
An act or expression of welcoming.

A hearty (or cold) welcome.

noun
0
0
You are welcome here.
interjection
0
0
To receive or accept with pleasure or satisfaction.

To welcome criticism.

verb
0
0
Greeting given upon someone's arrival.
interjection
0
0
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To affirm or greet the arrival of someone, especially by saying "Welcome!".
verb
0
0
To accept something willingly or gladly.

We welcome suggestions for improvement.

verb
0
0
Whose arrival is a cause of joy; received with gladness; admitted willingly to the house, entertainment, or company.

A welcome visitor.

adjective
0
0
Producing gladness.

A welcome present; welcome news.

adjective
0
0
Free to have or enjoy gratuitously.

You are welcome to the use of my library.

adjective
0
0
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The act of greeting someone's arrival, especially by saying "Welcome!"; reception.
noun
0
0
The utterance of such a greeting.
noun
0
0
Kind reception of a guest or newcomer.

We entered the house and found a ready welcome.

noun
0
0
The state of being welcome.

Don't overstay your welcome.

noun
0
1
To meet, receive, or acknowledge in a specified way; greet.
verb
0
1
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wear out (one's) welcome
  • To visit so often or stay so long as to become a nuisance.
idiom
0
0
bid welcome
  • to receive with cordial greetings
idiom
0
1
wear out one's welcome
  • to come so often or stay so long that one is no longer welcome
idiom
0
0
you're welcome
  • you're under no obligation for the favor given
idiom
0
0

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
welcome
Plural:
welcomes

Origin of welcome

  • Middle English alteration (influenced by wel well) of Old English wilcuma welcome guest, welcome gwā- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English welcome, wolcume, wulcume, wilcume, from Old English wilcuma ("one whose coming is pleasant, a welcome person or thing, a guest"; compare also wilcume (“welcome!", interjection)), from Proto-Germanic *weljakwumô (“a comer, a welcomed guest"), equivalent to will (“desire") +"Ž come (“comer, arrival"). Cognate with Scots walcome (“welcome"), West Frisian wolkom (“welcome"), Dutch welkom (“welcome"), German willkommen (“welcome"), Danish and Norwegian velkommen (“welcome"), Swedish välkommen (“welcome"), Icelandic velkomin (“welcome").

    From Wiktionary

  • Similar constructions are common in Romance languages, such as Italian benvenuto, Spanish bienvenido, French bienvenue and Portuguese bem-vindo, each meaning “[may you have fared] well [in] coming [here]". These do not derive from Classic Latin, where a similar construction is not found, and presumably are instead the result of a calque from Germanic to Proto-Romance (Vulgar Latin).

    From Wiktionary