Will meaning

wĭl
Used to express possibility.

This drawer will open with a little effort.

verb
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A document spelling out what is to be done with the person’s (testator’s) belongings after she has died. Such document has no force while the person is alive and may be altered or revoked at any time, but becomes applicable at the time of the testator’s death to whatever the conditions of the estate are at the time of death. The difference between a deed and a will is that a deed passes an interest upon delivery, while a will is effective only on death.
noun
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The legal statement of a person's wishes concerning the disposal of his or her property after death.
noun
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Used in polite questions.

Will you have some wine?

verb
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Desire, intent, choice, as in, “she exercised her own free will.”
noun
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Disposition or attitude toward others.

A man of good will.

noun
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Energy and enthusiasm.

To work with a will.

noun
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A compelling command or decree.

The will of the people.

noun
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The document containing this.
noun
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To have as the object of one's will; desire; want.

To will another's happiness, to will to survive.

verb
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Used to indicate simple future time.

When will she be able to travel? I will bring the dessert.

verb
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Used to express determination, compulsion, or obligation.

You will listen to me; he will have his own way; I will have you know that I was here first.

verb
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Used to express habit or customary practice.

They will talk shop for hours on end.

verb
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Used to express expectation or surmise.

That will be his wife with him, I suppose.

verb
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To wish; desire.

What will you, Master?

verb
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A legal document that carries out the last wishes of a deceased person. The will outlines how the deceased person’s assets should be distributed and appoints executors to carry out those wishes. Wills must be signed and witnessed. See also estate and estate planning.
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The right of a grantee to use and possess land by mutual agreement (or will) with the grantor; the right to use the property terminates when the will of either party ends.
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See holographic will.
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A single will signed by two or more persons but that is not necessarily reciprocating or mutual.
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Phrase commonly used to refer to the latest (most recent) instrument directing the disposition of the personal property of the signer(s).
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See reciprocal will.
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An oral will dictated by the testator just before death, before a certain number of witnesses (depending on state law), and put in written form after death; generally invalid in most states.
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(archaic) Desire, longing. (Now generally merged with later senses.) [from 9th c.]

He felt a great will to make a pilgrimage to the Holy Land.

noun
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One's independent faculty of choice; the ability to be able to exercise one's choice or intention. [from 9th c.]

Of course, man's will is often regulated by his reason.

noun
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One's intention or decision; someone's orders or commands. [from 9th c.]

Eventually I submitted to my parents' will.

noun
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(archaic) That which is desired; one's wish. [from 10th c.]
noun
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The act of choosing to do something; a person's conscious intent or volition. [from 10th c.]

Most creatures have a will to live.

noun
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A formal declaration of one's intent concerning the disposal of one's property and holdings after death; the legal document stating such wishes. [from 14th c.]
noun
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(archaic) To wish, desire. [9th-19th c.]
verb
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(rare, intransitive) To wish or desire (that something happen); to intend (that). [9th-19th c.]
verb
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(auxiliary) To habitually do (a given action). [from 9th c.]
verb
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(auxiliary) To choose to (do something), used to express intention but without any temporal connotations (+ bare infinitive). [from 10th c.]
verb
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(auxiliary) Used to express the future tense, formerly with some implication of volition when used in first person. Compare shall. [from 10th c.]
verb
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To decree, dictate, or order.

Believed that the outcome was willed by the gods.

verb
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The power of making a reasoned choice or decision or of controlling one's own actions.

A man of weak will.

noun
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Strong and fixed purpose; determination.

Where there's a will there's a way.

noun
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To bequeath by a will.
verb
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One will executed by two or more persons with reciprocating provisions of consideration of each to the other.
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(rare) To wish, desire (something). [9th-18th c.]
verb
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(auxiliary) To be able to, to have the capacity to. [from 14th c.]

Unfortunately, only one of these gloves will actually fit over my hand.

verb
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A diminutive of the male given name William. Also used as a formal given name.
pronoun
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A patronymic surname.
pronoun
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(American football) A weak-side linebacker.
noun
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Will is the act of strongly desiring something to happen, trying to make something happen by hoping, or describing something you intend to happen in the future.

An example of will is when you hope very hard that your medical exam won't show anything bad.

An example of will is when you try to encourage yourself to exercise.

An example of will is when you say something is going to occur in the future.

verb
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A will is a legal document that tells what a person wants to have done with their property after their death.

An example of a will is a document that says that a widow wants to have all her money and property equally divided between her children after her death.

noun
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Will is your ability to make decisions or restraining yourself from doing something or something that a person desires or wants.

An example of will is your ability to quit your job whenever you want or to quit of your own choosing.

An example of will is when you want to eat cookies but you exercise restraint and make yourself eat carrots instead.

An example of will is when a hurricane happens and people say it was God's plan .

noun
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The mental faculty by which one deliberately chooses or decides upon a course of action.

Championed freedom of will against a doctrine of predetermination.

noun
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A desire, purpose, or determination, especially of one in authority.

It is the sovereign's will that the prisoner be spared.

noun
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Deliberate intention or wish.

Let it be known that I took this course of action against my will.

noun
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Free discretion; inclination or pleasure.

Wandered about, guided only by will.

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Bearing or attitude toward others; disposition.

Full of good will.

noun
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Self-control; self-discipline.

Lacked the will to overcome the addiction.

noun
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A legal declaration of how a person wishes his or her possessions to be disposed of after death.
noun
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A legally executed document containing this declaration.
noun
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To induce or try to induce by sheer force of will.

We willed the sun to come out.

verb
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To decide on or intend.

He can finish the race if he wills it.

verb
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To yearn for; desire.
verb
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To grant in a legal will; bequeath.

Willed his fortune to charity.

verb
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To order to direct in a legal will.

She willed that her money be given to charity.

verb
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To exercise the will.
verb
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To make a choice; choose.

Do as you will.

verb
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Used to indicate simple futurity.

They will appear later.

verb
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Used to indicate likelihood or certainty.

You will regret this.

verb
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Used to indicate willingness.

Will you help me with this package?

verb
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Used to indicate requirement or command.

You will report to me afterward.

verb
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Used to indicate customary or habitual action.

People will talk.

verb
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Used to indicate capacity or ability.

This metal will not crack under heavy pressure.

verb
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Used to indicate probability or expectation.

That will be the messenger ringing.

verb
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To wish; desire.

Do what you will. Sit here if you will.

verb
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The particular desire, purpose, pleasure, choice, etc. of a certain person or group.

What is your will?

noun
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To control or influence by the power of the will.

To will oneself into an action, to will others into submission.

verb
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To exert one's will.

To succeed by willing.

verb
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To wish, desire, prefer, or choose.

To do as one wills.

verb
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Used to express inclination or inevitability.

Boys will be boys.

verb
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(intransitive) To instruct (that something be done) in one's will. [from 9th c.]
verb
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To try to make (something) happen by using one's will (intention). [from 10th c.]

All the fans were willing their team to win the game.

verb
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To bequeath (something) to someone in one's will (legal document). [from 15th c.]

He willed his stamp collection to the local museum.

verb
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Diligent purposefulness; determination.

An athlete with the will to win.

noun
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Used to indicate intention.

I will too if I feel like it.

verb
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Origin of will

From Middle English willen, wullen, wollen, from Old English willan, wyllan (“to will, be willing, wish, desire, be used to, to be about to"), from Proto-Germanic *wiljanÄ… (“to desire, wish"), from Proto-Indo-European *(e)welǝ- (“to choose, wish"). Cognate with Dutch willen, Low German willen, German wollen, Swedish vilja, Latin velle (“wish", verb) and Albanian vel (“to satisfy, be stuffed") .It is not always distinguishable from Etymology 1, above.