Unity meaning

yo͝onĭ-tē
Frequency:
Unity is being in harmony or one in spirit.

An example of unity is a bride and groom both lighting a single candle at the same time with each of their candles.

noun
42
12
The quality of being one in spirit, sentiment, purpose, etc.; harmony; agreement; concord; uniformity.
noun
28
6
Something complete in itself; single, separate thing.
noun
18
7
The state of being one, or united; oneness; singleness.
noun
14
6
One of the three principles of dramatic structure derived by French neoclassicists from Aristotle's Poetics, stating that a drama should have but one plot, which should take place in a single day and be confined to a single locale.
noun
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13
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(drama) Any of the three classical rules of drama (unity of action, unity of place, and unity of time).`
noun
4
4
A town in Maine.
pronoun
2
3
A town in New Hampshire.
pronoun
2
3
Constancy, continuity, or fixity of purpose, action, etc.
noun
2
8
pronoun
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2
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A single undivided thing, seen as complete in itself.
noun
1
3
(mathematics) Any element of a set or field that behaves under a given operation as the number 1 behaves under multiplication.
noun
1
3
A female given name.
pronoun
1
3
A city in Oregon.
pronoun
1
3
A village and two towns in Wisconsin.
pronoun
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3
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(uncountable) Oneness; the state or fact of being one undivided entity.
noun
1
4
Singleness or constancy of purpose or action; continuity.
noun
0
0
The quality or fact of being a totality or whole or, esp., of being a union of related parts.
noun
0
0
the (three) unities
  • the three principles of dramatic construction derived by French neoclassicists from Aristotle's Poetics, holding that a play should have one unified plot (unity of action) and that all the action should occur within one day (unity of time) and be limited to a single locale (unity of place)
idiom
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1

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

the (three) unities

Origin of unity

  • Middle English unite from Old French from Latin ūnitās from ūnus one oi-no- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Anglo-Norman unité, Old French unité, from Latin Å«nitās, from Å«nus (“one") + noun of state suffix -itās.

    From Wiktionary

  • Majuscule letter version of unity

    From Wiktionary