Like meaning

līk
(scots) To be pleased.
verb
24
6
To have an inclination or a preference.

If you like, we can meet you there.

verb
15
8
(archaic) To be pleasing to.
verb
14
7
To believe or predict that (a certain competitor) will win a contest.

Which team do you like in tonight's game?

verb
14
8
To perform well under (a given condition) or using (a given feature).

This car does not like cold weather. The engine does not like enriched fuel.

verb
11
8
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Something that is liked; a preference.

Made a list of his likes and dislikes.

noun
3
0
To feel about; regard.

How do you like these new theater seats?

verb
2
0
Possessing the characteristics of; resembling closely; similar to.

Your house is like mine.

preposition
2
0
Inclined or disposed to.

Felt like running away.

preposition
2
0
Such as; for example.

Saved things like old newspapers and pieces of string.

preposition
2
0
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(nonstandard) Used to provide emphasis or to focus attention on something.

Let's like talk about this for a minute. It's like so crowded you can't move.

adverb
2
0
As if the probability exists for.

Looks like a bad year for farmers.

preposition
1
0
Possessing the same or almost the same characteristics; similar.

On this and like occasions.

adjective
1
0
In the manner of being; as if. Used as an intensifier of action.

Worked like hell; ran like crazy.

adverb
1
0
(informal) Probably; likely.

Like as not she'll change her mind.

adverb
1
0
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Nearly; approximately.

The price is more like 1,000 dollars.

adverb
1
0
One similar to or like another. Used with the .

Was subject to coughs, asthma, and the like.

noun
1
0
(informal) An equivalent or similar person or thing; an equal or match.

I've never seen the likes of this before. We'll never see his like again.

noun
1
0
In the same way that; as.

To dance like she does requires great discipline.

conjunction
1
0
As if.

It looks like we'll finish on time.

conjunction
1
0
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To have a taste or fondness for; be pleased with; have a preference for; enjoy.
verb
1
0
Resembling or characteristic of.

Ladylike.

suffix
0
0
Having almost or exactly the same qualities, characteristics, etc.; similar; equal.

A cup of sugar and a like amount of flour.

adjective
0
0
(rare) Alike.
adjective
0
0
(dial.) Likely.
adjective
0
0
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(informal) Likely.

Like as not, he is already there.

adverb
0
0
Similar to; somewhat resembling.

She is like a bird.

preposition
0
0
In a manner characteristic of; similarly to.

She sings like a bird.

preposition
0
0
In accord with the nature of; characteristic of.

It's not like her to sleep late.

preposition
0
0
In the mood for; desirous of.

To feel like sleeping.

preposition
0
0
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Indicative or prophetic of.

That sounds like fun; it looks like a clear day tomorrow.

preposition
0
0
As for example.

Great dramatists like Sophocles and Shakespeare.

preposition
0
0
In the way that; as.

It was just like you said.

conjunction
0
0
As if.

It looks like he is late.

conjunction
0
0
A person or thing regarded as the equal or counterpart of another or of the person or thing being discussed.

I've never met her like.

noun
0
0
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(informal) Inserted into spoken sentences before or after a word, phrase, or clause, apparently without meaning or syntactic function, but possibly for emphasis.

It's, like, hot.

interjection
0
0
(obs.) To please.
verb
0
0
To be so inclined; choose.

Leave whenever you like.

verb
0
0
To want or wish.

I would like to see him.

verb
0
0
(informal) To favor and support as the probable winner.

I like Chicago in the World Series.

verb
0
0
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Preferences, tastes, or affections.
noun
0
0
Like, characteristic of, suitable for.

Doglike, manlike, homelike.

affix
0
0
In the manner of.

Coward-like.

affix
0
0
(archaic) To please.
verb
0
0
To enjoy, be pleased by; favor; be in favor of.

I like hamburgers; I like skiing in winter; I like the Seattle Mariners this season.

verb
0
0
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1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 1, The Celebrity.

He used to drop into my chambers once in a while to smoke, and was first-rate company. When I gave a dinner there was generally a cover laid for him. I liked the man for his own sake, and even had he promised to turn out a celebrity it would have had no weight with me.

verb
0
0
To prefer and maintain (an action) as a regular habit or activity.

I like to go to the dentist every six months; She likes to keep herself physically fit; we like to keep one around the office just in case.

verb
0
0
(archaic) To come near; to avoid with difficulty; to escape narrowly.

He liked to have been too late.

verb
0
0
To find attractive; to prefer the company of; to have mild romantic feelings for.

I really like Sandra but don't know how to tell her.

verb
0
0
(Internet) To show support for, or approval of, something posted on the Internet by marking it with a vote.

I liked my friend's last status on Facebook.

I can't stand Bloggs' tomato ketchup, but I liked it on Facebook so I could enter a competition.

verb
0
0
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(usually plural) Something that a person likes (prefers).

Tell me your likes and dislikes.

noun
0
0
(Internet) The act of showing support for, or approval of, something posted on the Internet by marking it with a vote.
noun
0
0

My partner and I have like minds.

adjective
0
0
Clarendon.

Many were not easy to be governed, nor like to conform themselves to strict rules.

adjective
0
0
(informal) For example, such as: to introduce an example or list of examples.

There are lots of birds, like ducks and gulls, in this park.

adverb
0
0
(archaic, colloquial) Likely.
adverb
0
0
(sometimes as the likes of) Someone similar to a given person, or something similar to a given object; a comparative; a type; a sort.

There were bowls full of sweets, chocolates and the like.

It was something the likes of which I had never seen before.

noun
0
0
As if; as though.

It looks like you've finished the project.

It seemed like you didn't care.

conjunction
0
0
Somewhat similar to, reminiscent of.

These hamburgers taste like leather.

preposition
0
0
(Liverpudlian, Geordie) Used to place emphasis upon a statement.

Divint ye knaa, like?

interjection
0
0
The definition of a like is a preference or something that one enjoys.

An example of like is Merlot to a wine lover.

noun
0
1
Like means similar or nearly the same.

An example of like is white as compared to off-white.

adjective
0
1
Like is defined as to enjoy or agree with something.

An example of like is to favor chocolate ice cream.

verb
0
1
To find pleasant or attractive; enjoy.

Do you like ice cream? I like your style.

verb
0
1
Used with a past infinitive or with to and a simple past form to indicate being just on the point of or coming near to having done something in the past.
verb
0
1
like it or not
  • No matter how one might feel:
    Like it or not, we have to get up early tomorrow.
idiom
0
0
(informal) be like
  • To say or utter. Used chiefly in oral narration:
    And he's like, “Leave me alone!”.
idiom
0
0
like so
  • In the manner indicated:
    You apply the paint like so.
idiom
0
0
and the like
  • and so forth; et cetera
idiom
0
0
be like
  • to say, think, or feel
    So I'm like, “We have to be there on time,” and he's like all nervous.
idiom
0
0
like anything
  • very much; exceedingly
idiom
0
0
(as) like as not
  • most likely; probably
idiom
0
0
like blazes
  • with furious energy, speed, etc.
idiom
0
0
like to
  • nearly; almost
    He like to broke the door down.
idiom
0
0
more like it
  • closer to being what is wanted or needed
idiom
0
0
nothing like
  • not at all like; completely different from
idiom
0
0
something like
  • almost like; about
idiom
0
0
the like
  • others of the same kind
idiom
0
0
the like of
  • any person or thing of a type like
idiom
0
0

Origin of like

  • From Webster's New World College Dictionary, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from like similar (from Old English gelīc) (Old Norse līkr) and from like similarly (from Old English gelīce) (from gelīc similar) līk- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English liken from Old English līcian to please līk- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English liken to compare from like similar like2

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from like similar like2

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English liken, from Old English lÄ«cian (“to please, be sufficient"), from Proto-Germanic *lÄ«kōnÄ…, *lÄ«kānÄ… (“to please"), from Proto-Indo-European *lÄ«g- (“image, likeness, similarity"). Cognate with Dutch lijken (“to seem"), German gleichen (“to resemble"), Icelandic líka (“to like"), Norwegian like (“to like"), Albanian ngjaj (“I resemble, I'm alike") from archaic nglâj.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English, from Old English Ä¡elÄ«Ä‹ by shortening, influenced by Old Norse líkr. Cognate with alike; more distantly, with lich and -ly.

    From Wiktionary