Endure meaning

ĕn-do͝or, -dyo͝or
To carry on through, despite hardships; undergo or suffer.

Endure an Arctic winter.

verb
12
5
To continue in existence; last.

Buildings that have endured for centuries.

verb
12
9
To put up with; tolerate.
verb
9
6
To hold up under (pain, fatigue, etc.); stand; bear; undergo.
verb
7
5
To suffer patiently without yielding.
verb
7
6
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To put up with; tolerate.

I cannot endure your insolence any longer.

verb
4
4
To continue in existence; last; remain.
verb
4
4
Endure is defined as to put up with or to undergo.

An example of endure is someone continuing to run a marathon after twisting their ankle.

verb
4
5
To bear pain, etc. without flinching; hold out.
verb
3
3
(intransitive) To continue or carry on, despite obstacles or hardships.

The singer's popularity endured for decades.

verb
3
3
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To tolerate or put up with something unpleasant.
verb
2
1
(intransitive) To last.

Our love will endure forever.

verb
1
1
To remain firm, as under trial or suffering; to suffer patiently or without yielding; to bear up under adversity; to hold out.
verb
1
1

He endured years of pain.

verb
0
1

Origin of endure

  • Middle English enduren from Old French endurer from Latin indūrāre to make hard in- against, into en–1 dūrus hard deru- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English enduren, from Old French endurer, from Latin indūrō (“to make hard”). Displaced Old English drēogan, which survives dialectally as dree.

    From Wiktionary