Stern meaning

stûrn
Frequency:
Hard, harsh, or severe in manner or character.

A stern disciplinarian.

adjective
16
2
(nautical) The rear part of a ship or boat.
noun
10
1
The stern is defined as the rear of anything.

An example of stern is the back of a boat.

noun
8
3
Showing or expressing displeasure or disapproval; forbidding or harsh.

A stern face; a stern voice.

adjective
8
3
Firm or unyielding; uncompromising.

Stern resistance.

adjective
7
3
Advertisement
The definition of stern is someone who is very serious or strict.

An example of stern is a teacher when he is scolding a student.

adjective
4
3
Grim and forbidding in appearance.
adjective
2
1
Difficult to endure; oppressive.

Stern necessity.

adjective
2
3
Unshakable; firm.

Stern determination.

adjective
1
1
Relentless; inexorable.

Stern reality.

adjective
1
2
Advertisement
The rear end of a ship or boat.
noun
0
0
The rear end of anything.
noun
0
0
(person) 1920-2001; U.S. violinist, born in Russia.
proper name
0
0
(person) 1888-1969; U.S. physicist, born in Germany.
proper name
0
0
Having a hardness and severity of nature or manner.
adjective
0
0
Advertisement
(nautical) The rear part or after end of a ship or vessel.
noun
0
0
(figuratively) The post of management or direction.
noun
0
0
The hinder part of anything.

noun
0
0
The tail of an animal; now used only of the tail of a dog.
noun
0
0
A bird, the black tern.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
A rear part or section.
noun
0
1
Hard; severe; unyielding; strict.

Stern measures.

adjective
0
1
Grim; forbidding.

A stern face.

adjective
0
1

Origin of stern

  • Middle English sterne perhaps of Scandinavian origin Old Norse stjōrn rudder stā- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English sterne from Old English styrne ster-1 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English stern, sterne, sturne, from Old English styrne (“stern, grave, strict, austere, hard, severe, cruel"), from Proto-Germanic *sturnijaz (“angry, astonished, shocked"), from Proto-Indo-European *ster-, *ter- (“rigid, stiff"). Cognate with Scots stern (“bold, courageous, fierce, resolute"), Old High German stornÄ“n (“to be astonished"), Dutch stuurs (“glum, austere"), Swedish stursk (“insolent").

    From Wiktionary

  • Most likely from Old Norse stjórn (“control, steering"), related to stýra (“to steer"), from Proto-Germanic *stiurijanÄ…, whence also English steer. Also possibly from Old Frisian stiarne (“rudder"), from the same Germanic root.

    From Wiktionary

  • Old English

    From Wiktionary