Rump meaning

rŭmp
Frequency:
The fleshy hindquarters of an animal.
noun
0
0
A cut of beef or veal from the rump.
noun
0
0
The buttocks.
noun
0
0
The part of a bird's back nearest the tail.
noun
0
0
The last or inferior part.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
A legislature having only a small part of its original membership and therefore being unrepresentative or lacking in authority.
noun
0
0
The hind part of the body of an animal, where the legs and back join, or the sacral part of a bird.
noun
0
0
A cut of meat, usually beef, from this part, behind the loin and above the round.
noun
0
0
The buttocks.
noun
0
0
The last, unimportant or inferior part; mere remnant.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
A legislature or other body having only a remnant of its former membership, as because of expulsions, and hence regarded as unrepresentative and without authority.
noun
0
0
The fleshy hindquarters of an animal.
noun
0
0
The buttocks.
noun
0
0
The part of a bird's back nearest the tail.
noun
0
0
noun
0
0
Advertisement
A cut of meat from the rump.
noun
0
0
noun
0
0
Remnant, as in rump parliament.
noun
0
0

Origin of rump

  • Middle English rumpe of Scandinavian origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English rumpe, from Old Norse rumpr (“rump"), from Middle Low German rump (“the bulk or trunk of a body, trunk of a tree"), ultimately from Proto-Germanic *rumpō (“trunk of a tree, log"). Cognate with Icelandic rumpur (“rump"), Swedish rumpa (“rump"), Dutch romp (“trunk, body, hull"), German Rumpf (“hull, trunk, torso, trunk").

    From Wiktionary

  • In the sense of remnant, first attested in the Rump Parliament of 1648.

    From Wiktionary