Prevail definition

prĭ-vāl
To gain the advantage or mastery; be victorious; triumph.
verb
11
3
To produce or achieve the desired effect; be effective; succeed.
verb
6
0
To exist widely; be prevalent.
verb
6
2
To be in force, use, or effect; be current.

An ancient tradition that still prevails.

verb
7
4
To be or become stronger or more widespread; predominate.
verb
4
1
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(intransitive) To be current, widespread or predominant; to have currency or prevalence.

In his day and age, such practices prevailed all over Europe.

verb
1
0
To be greater in strength or influence; triumph.

The home team prevailed against the visitors. Shouldn't the public interest prevail over an individual's?

verb
4
4
To be most common or frequent; be predominant.

A region where snow and ice prevail.

verb
1
1
Prevail is to be widespread or victorious.

When there is a general atmosphere of sadness in a town, this is an example of when sadness prevails.

When a politician wins an election, this is an example of when he prevails over his opponent.

verb
0
0
(intransitive) To be superior in strength, dominance, influence or frequency; to have or gain the advantage over others; to have the upper hand; to outnumber others.

Red colour prevails in the Canadian flag.

verb
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(intransitive) To succeed in persuading or inducing.

I prevailed on him to wait.

verb
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0
To use persuasion or inducement successfully. Often used with on, upon, or with.
verb
0
2
prevail on
  • to persuade or induce; appeal to
  • to make use of for one's own benefit
    To prevail on a friend's good nature.
idiom
0
1

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

prevail on

Origin of prevail

  • Middle English prevailen from Old French prevaloir prevaill- from Latin praevalēre to be stronger prae- pre- valēre to be strong wal- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English prevailen, from Old French prevaler, from Latin praevaleō (“be very able or more able, be superior, prevail"), from prae (“before") + valeō (“be able or powerful").

    From Wiktionary