Rage meaning

rāj
Rage is an intense, uncontrolled anger or a great force.

An example of rage is someone screaming at the top of their lungs, holding a bat and charging toward another person.

An example of rage is the force of a tornado.

noun
11
2
A burning desire; a passion.

A rage for innovation in music.

noun
5
1
To move with great violence or intensity.

A storm raged through the mountains.

verb
4
0
A current, eagerly adopted fashion; a fad or craze.

When torn jeans were all the rage.

noun
4
1
To spread or prevail forcefully.

The plague raged for months.

verb
3
0
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Insanity.
noun
3
0
A furious, uncontrolled anger; esp., a brief spell of raving fury.
noun
2
0
A great force, violence, or intensity, as of the wind.
noun
2
0
Strong emotion, enthusiasm, or desire.
noun
2
0
To show violent anger in action or speech.
verb
2
0
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To be forceful, violent, uncontrolled, etc.

A raging sea, a raging fever.

verb
1
0
To spread unchecked, as a disease.
verb
1
0
Violent, explosive anger.
noun
1
0
A fit of anger.
noun
1
0
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Miniskirts were all the rage back then.

noun
1
0
Thomas Macaulay (1800-1859)

He appeased the rage of hunger with some scraps of broken meat.

noun
1
0
Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864)

Convulsed with a rage of grief.

noun
1
0
(intransitive) To act or speak in heightened anger.
verb
1
0
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(intransitive) To move with great violence, as a storm etc.
verb
1
0
Furious intensity, as of a storm or disease.
noun
1
1
To speak or act in violent anger.

Raged at the mindless bureaucracy.

verb
1
1
(all) the rage
  • Anything arousing widespread enthusiasm or interest; craze; fad.
idiom
1
0

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of rage

  • Middle English from Old French from Vulgar Latin rabia from Latin rabiēs from rabere to be mad

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Old French raige, rage (French: rage), from Medieval Latin rabia, from Latin rabies (“anger fury").

    From Wiktionary