Pout meaning

pout
To exhibit displeasure or disappointment; sulk.
verb
7
1
Any of various freshwater or marine fishes having a large head, especially an eelpout or a bullhead.
noun
5
1
Pout is defined as to protude the lips or outwardly express disapproval by sulking.

An example of pout is a child sitting with their arms folded, looking down at the ground after not getting their way.

verb
4
1
To protrude the lips in an expression of displeasure or sulkiness.
verb
4
1
To project or protrude.

The child's lips pouted.

verb
4
1
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To push out or protrude (the lips).
verb
1
0
To utter or express with a pout.
verb
1
0
A protrusion of the lips, especially as an expression of sullen discontent.
noun
1
0
A fit of petulant sulkiness.

Sat around in the house in a pout; had the pouts.

noun
1
0
To thrust out the lips as in sullenness or displeasure.
verb
1
0
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To sulk.
verb
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To protrude.
verb
0
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To thrust out (the lips)
verb
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0
The act of pouting.
noun
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A fit of sulking.
noun
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0
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Any of several fishes with a stout body, as an eelpout.
noun
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One's facial expression when pouting.
noun
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noun
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(intransitive) To push out one's lips.
verb
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(intransitive) To be or pretend to be ill-tempered; to sulk.
verb
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To say while pouting.
verb
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(rare) Shortened name of various fishes such as the hornpout (Ameiurus nebulosus, the brown bullhead), the pouting (Trisopterus luscus) and the eelpouts (Zoarcidae).
noun
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Alternative form of poult.
noun
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0
(Scotland) To shoot poults.
verb
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Origin of pout

  • Middle English poute from Old English -pūte (as in ǣlepūte eelpout)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English pouten perhaps of Scandinavian origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English pouten, probably from Scandinavian (compare Norwegian pute (“pillow, cushion"), Swedish dial. puta (“to be puffed out"), Danish pude (“pillow, cushion")), from Proto-Germanic *pÅ«to (“swollen") (compare English eelpout, Dutch puit, Low German puddig (“inflated")), from Proto-Indo-European *bu- (“to swell") (compare Sanskrit [script?] (budbuda, “bubble")).

    From Wiktionary

  • From Old English pÅ«te as in aelepÅ«te, from Indo-European root beu having a meaning associated with the notion "to swell".

    From Wiktionary