Pique meaning

pēk
Pique is defined as to arouse someone's interest, curiosity or resentment.

An example of pique is an ad for a TV show that is intriguing and that makes people want to watch.

verb
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A state of vexation caused by a perceived slight or indignity; a feeling of wounded pride.
noun
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To provoke; arouse.

The portrait piqued her curiosity.

verb
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To cause to feel resentment or indignation.
verb
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To pride (oneself).

He piqued himself on his stylish attire.

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A tightly woven fabric with various raised patterns, produced especially by a double warp.
noun
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Resentment at being slighted or disdained; ruffled pride.
noun
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A fit of displeasure.
noun
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To arouse resentment in, as by slighting; ruffle the pride of.
verb
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To arouse; provoke.
verb
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A firmly woven cotton fabric with ribbed, corded, or ridged wales.
noun
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Designating fine seams that have been turned under before sewing, as on women's gloves.
adjective
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A feeling of enmity between two entities; ill-feeling, animosity; a transient feeling of wounded pride.
noun
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A feeling of irritation or resentment, awakened by a social slight or injury; offence, especially taken in an emotional sense with little thought or consideration.
noun
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To wound the pride of; to sting; to nettle; to irritate; to fret; to excite to anger.
verb
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(reflexive) To take pride in; to pride oneself on.
verb
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To excite (someone) to action by causing resentment or jealousy; to stimulate (a feeling, emotion); to offend by slighting.

I believe this will pique your interest.

verb
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In piquet, the right of the elder hand to count thirty in hand, or to play before the adversary counts one.
noun
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A chigger or jigger, Tunga penetrans.
noun
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A durable ribbed fabric made from cotton, rayon, or silk.
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pique oneself on
  • To be proud of.
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

pique oneself on

Origin of pique

  • French a prick, irritation from Old French from piquer to prick from Vulgar Latin piccāre ultimately of imitative origin
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • French past participle of piquer to quilt from Old French to backstitch, prick pique
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Middle French pique (“a prick, sting"), from Old French pic (“a sharp point"). Etymological twin to pike (“long pointed weapon").
    From Wiktionary
  • From French piqué from past participle of French piquer (“to prick, quilt")
    From Wiktionary
  • From Spanish pique, from Central Quechua piki.
    From Wiktionary
  • From French pic.
    From Wiktionary