Pike definition

pīk
A long spear formerly used by infantry.
noun
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A freshwater game and food fish (Esox lucius) of the Northern Hemisphere that has a long snout and attains a length of over 1.2 meters (4 feet).
noun
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The definition of a pike is a summit, mountain or hill with a peak, or a spike or spear, or a slender fish with sharp teeth in the family Esocidae and order Salmoniformes.

An example of a pike is a major country road.

An example of a pike is a long hunting spear.

An example of a pike is an Esox.

noun
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A hill with a pointed summit.
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A tollgate on a turnpike.
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A highway.
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A peaked summit.
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A mountain or hill with a peaked summit.
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(Australia, New Zealand, slang, often with "on" or "out") To quit or back out of a promise.

Don't pike on me like you did last time!

verb
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Pike is defined as to pierce or kill with a spear.

An example of pike is to stab a fish with a spear.

verb
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A turnpike.
noun
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A toll paid.
noun
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To move quickly.
verb
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A spike or sharp point, as on the tip of a spear.
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A mid-air position in sports such as diving and gymnastics in which the athlete bends to touch the feet or grab the calves or back of the thighs while keeping the legs together and straight.
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A weapon, formerly used by foot soldiers, consisting of a metal spearhead on a long wooden shaft.
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To pierce or kill with or as with a pike.
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Any of a family (Esocidae, order Salmoniformes) of slender, voracious, freshwater bony fishes with a narrow, pointed head and conspicuous, sharp teeth; esp., a species (Esox lucius) of the northern parts of the Northern Hemisphere.
noun
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Any of various fishes resembling the true pikes, as the walleye.
noun
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A spike; point, as the pointed tip of a spear.
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(person) 1779-1813; U.S. general & explorer.
proper name
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A very long thrusting spear used two-handed by infantry both for attacks on enemy foot soldiers and as a counter-measure against cavalry assaults. The pike is not intended to be thrown.
noun
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A sharp point, such as that of the weapon.

noun
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Any carnivorous freshwater fish of the genus Esox, especially the northern pike, Esox lucius.
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A pointy extrusion at the toe of a shoe, found in old-fashioned footwear.
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(diving) A dive position with knees straight and a tight bend at the hips.
noun
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To attack, prod, or injure someone with a pike.
verb
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(now UK regional) A mountain peak or summit.
noun
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anagrams
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A surname of multiple origins, including Middle English pike.
pronoun
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To attack or pierce with a pike.
verb
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Any of various fishes closely related to this fish, such as the muskellunge or the pickerels.
noun
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Any of various fishes that resemble this fish.
noun
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A large haycock.

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(slang) come down the pike
  • To come into prominence:
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
pike
Plural:
pikes

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of pike

  • French pique from Old French from piquer to prick pique

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English perhaps from Old English pīc sharp point (from its shape)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Probably from pike (from the resemblance of the position to the fish's head)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English possibly of Scandinavian origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old English pīc

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Short for turnpike

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle French pique (“long thrusting weapon"), from Old French pic (“sharp point"), and from Old English pÄ«c (“pointed object, pick axe"), ultimately a variant form of pick, with meaning narrowed.

    From Wiktionary

  • Perhaps a special use of Etymology 1, above; or from an early Scandinavian language, compare Norwegian pik (“summit").

    From Wiktionary

  • Cognate with Dutch piek, dialectal German Peik, Norwegian pik. Etymological twin to pique.

    From Wiktionary