Prod meaning

prŏd
The definition of a prod is an action intended as a reminder, or is a poke with a finger or other pointed object.

When you remind someone to do something, this reminder is an example of a prod.

A poke with a finger is an example of a prod.

noun
3
0
To prod is to encourage someone to do something, or to poke at someone with your finger, foot or other pointed object.

When you encourage your spouse to go back to school, this is an example of a time when you prod him to go to school.

When you poke someone with your finger, this is an example of a time when you prod.

verb
2
0
To jab or poke, as with a pointed object.
verb
2
0
To goad to action; incite.
verb
2
0
A pointed object used to prod.

A cattle prod.

noun
2
0
Advertisement
An incitement; a stimulus.
noun
0
0
Used as a disparaging term for a Protestant.
noun
0
0
To jab or poke with or as with a pointed stick; goad.
verb
0
0
To urge or stir into action.
verb
0
0
The act of prodding; jab, poke, thrust, etc.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
Something that prods; specif., a rod or pointed stick used in driving cattle.
noun
0
0
Produce.
abbreviation
0
0
Produced.
abbreviation
0
0
Product.
abbreviation
0
0
Production.
abbreviation
0
0
Advertisement
To poke, to push, to touch.
verb
0
0
verb
0
0
A device (now often electrical) used to goad livestock into moving.
noun
0
0
A prick or stab with such a pointed instrument.
noun
0
0
A poke.

"It's your turn," she reminded me, giving me a prod on the shoulder.

noun
0
0
Advertisement
A light kind of crossbow; a prodd.

noun
0
0
(slang, sometimes derogatory) A Protestant, (as termed by Roman Catholics), that is in the context of their religious beliefs, or those who have been born in the Protestant tradition, or sometimes those implied to be Protestant by their political ideology of Irish unionism or Ulster loyalism.
noun
0
0
(law) Abbreviation of product.
noun
0
0
(law) Abbreviation of production.
noun
0
0

Origin of prod

  • Origin unknown
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English brodden, from Old Norse broddr (“shaft, spike"), from Proto-Germanic *bruzdaz. Cognate with Icelandic broddur, Danish brod.
    From Wiktionary