Brave meaning

brāv
Brave means to face something with courage.

An example of brave is to dash into a building on fire to save a youngster.

verb
26
3
The definition of brave is having courage.

An example of brave is a soldier who goes into combat.

adjective
15
1
Brave is defined as someone who has courage, particularly a Native American warrior.

An example of brave is Geronimo.

noun
15
1
Making a fine display; impressive or showy.
adjective
12
4
Any brave man.
noun
7
2
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Possessing or displaying courage.
adjective
6
3
Willing to face danger, pain, or trouble; not afraid.
adjective
5
1
(archaic) A bully.
noun
3
1
To face with courage.
verb
3
1
(obs.) To boast.
verb
3
2
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Making a fine show or display.
adjective
2
2
(archaic) Fine or splendid.

A brave new world.

adjective
2
3
To endure or face courageously.
verb
1
0
A Native American warrior.
noun
1
0
A man daring beyond discretion; a bully.
noun
1
0
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A challenge; a defiance; bravado.
noun
1
0
To encounter with courage and fortitude, to defy.

After braving tricks on the high-dive, he braved a jump off the first diving platform.

verb
1
0
People who exhibit bravery or courage considered as a group.
noun
1
1
Excellent; great.
adjective
1
2
A Native American warrior.
noun
1
2
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(obsolete) To make showy or splendid.
verb
1
2
To make a courageous show or put up a stalwart front.
verb
1
2
Showing to good effect; having a fine appearance.
adjective
1
2
(obs.) To make splendid, as in dress.
verb
1
2
Strong in the face of fear; courageous.
adjective
1
2
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Samuel Pepys.

It being a brave day, I walked to Whitehall.

adjective
0
2
(archaic) A bully.
noun
0
4
A North American Indian warrior.
noun
0
4
To defy; dare.
verb
0
4

Origin of brave

  • Middle English from Old French from Old Italian or Old Spanish bravo wild, brave, excellent probably from Vulgar Latin brabus from Latin barbarus barbarous

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • French brave, borrowed from Italian bravo, itself either from Provençal brau (“show-off”), from Gaulish *bragos (compare Middle Irish breagha (modern breá) 'fine', Breton braga 'to strut') or from Latin *bravus, from a fusion of pravus and barbarus into a root *bravus.

    From Wiktionary