Brave-new-world meaning

The definition of brave new world is an imaginary technology-based society that is unkind and lacks creativity, referred to in Aldous Huxley's 1932 book The Brave New World.

An example of brave new world is a future where people are completely reliant on machines and computers and no longer care for each other.

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A world or realm of radically transformed existence, especially one in which technological progress has both positive and negative results.
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A field, endeavor, or aspect of life that seems new and often intimidating because one is experiencing it for the first time.
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A place or situation regarded as like that of a hypothetical future society in being, variously, dehumanized, disorienting, technologically revolutionary, etc.
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A better, often utopian (future) world.
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A terrible, often oppressive or dystopian world.
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Origin of brave-new-world

  • Originally a phrase written by William Shakespeare in The Tempest (c.1610): How beauteous mankind is! O brave new world / That has such people in't! (later used by Aldous Huxley as the title of his novel Brave New World (1932), a depiction of future dystopia in which humans are separated into rigid castes and controlled through technological and chemical means )
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From the title of Aldous Huxley's 1932 novel Brave New World, which is in turn a reference to a line from William Shakespeare's play The Tempest (first performed around 1611).
    From Wiktionary