Hide meaning

hīd
The skin of an animal, especially the thick tough skin or pelt of a large animal.
noun
15
5
Hide is defined as to conceal something, oneself, or others.

An example of hide is a tall person putting something on a high shelf so a short person can't find it.

verb
5
4
To put or keep out of sight or away from notice.

Hid the money in a sock.

verb
4
4
To prevent the disclosure or recognition of; conceal.

Tried to hide the facts.

verb
4
5
The definition of a hide is an animal skin.

An example of a hide is the thick skin of the buffalo which is used to create tents by many American Indian tribes.

noun
3
5
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To cut off from sight; cover up.

Clouds hid the stars.

verb
1
2
To keep oneself out of sight or notice.
verb
1
2
To seek refuge or respite.
verb
1
2
To beat severely; flog.
verb
1
2
(brit.) A place of concealment for an observer of wildlife, hunter, etc.
noun
0
0
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An animal skin or pelt, either raw or tanned.
noun
0
0
(informal) The skin of a person.
noun
0
0
(informal) To beat severely; flog.
verb
0
0
To avert (one's gaze), especially in shame or grief.
verb
0
1
An old English measure of land, usually the amount held adequate for one free family and its dependents.
noun
0
1
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To put or keep out of sight; secrete; conceal.
verb
0
1
To conceal from the knowledge of others; keep secret.

To hide one's identity.

verb
0
1
To keep from being seen by covering up, obscuring, etc.

Fog hid the road.

verb
0
1
To turn away.

To hide one's head in shame.

verb
0
1
To keep oneself out of sight; conceal oneself.
verb
0
1
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(historical) A medieval English unit of land measure varying from 60 to 120 acres (24 to 49 hectares)
noun
0
1
The skin of an animal, especially the thick tough skin or pelt of a large animal.
noun
0
1
To put (something) in a place where it will be harder to discover or out of sight.

He hides his magazines under the bed.

The politicians were accused of keeping information hidden from the public.

verb
0
1
(intransitive) To put oneself in a place where one will be harder to find or out of sight.
verb
0
1
(countable) The skin of an animal.
noun
0
1
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(derogatory) The human skin.
noun
0
1
(countable) (mainly British) A covered structure from which hunters, birdwatchers, etc can observe animals without scaring them.
noun
0
1
(uncountable, informal, usually US) One's own life or personal safety, especially when in peril.
noun
0
1
To beat with a whip made from hide.
verb
0
1
A medieval land measure equal to the amount of land that could sustain one free family; usually 100 acres. Forty hides equalled a barony.
noun
0
1
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hide nor hair
  • A trace; a vestige:
    Haven't seen hide nor hair of them since the argument.
idiom
0
0
neither hide nor hair
  • nothing whatsoever
idiom
0
0

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

neither hide nor hair

Origin of hide

  • Middle English hiden from Old English hȳdan (s)keu- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old English hȳd (s)keu- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old English hīd kei- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English hiden, huden, from Old English hȳdan (“to hide, conceal, preserve”), from Proto-Germanic *hūdijaną (“to conceal”), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)keudh- (“to cover, wrap, encase”), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)keu- (“to cover”). Cognate with Low German (ver)hüden, (ver)hüen (“to hide, cover, conceal”), Welsh cuddio (“to hide”), Ancient Greek κεύθω (keúthô, “to conceal”), Sanskrit [script?] (kuharam, “a cave”). Related to hut and sky.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English hide, from Old English hīd, hȳd, hīġed, hīġid (“a measure of land”), for earlier *hīwid (“the amount of land needed to support one family”), a derivative of Proto-Germanic *hīwaz, *hīwō (“relative, fellow-lodger, family”), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱei- (“to lie with, store, be familiar”). Related to Old English hīwisc (“hide of land, household”), Old English hīwan (“members of a family, household”). More at hewe, hind.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Old English hȳd, from Proto-Germanic *hūdiz (cf. West Frisian hûd, Dutch huid, German Haut), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)keu-t- 'skin, hide' (cf. Welsh cwd (“scrotum”), Latin cutis (“skin”), Lithuanian kutys (“purse, money-belt”), Ancient Greek κύτος (kýtos, “hollow vessel”), σκῦτος (skŷtos, “cover, hide”), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)keu-, 'to cover'. More at sky.

    From Wiktionary