Fell meaning

fĕl
To fell is to knock down, or is the past tense of "fall" and is defined as that you have fallen down.

When a strong wind knocks down a tree, this is an example of a situation where a strong wind fells a tree.

When you are standing upright and then you fall down, this is an example of a situation where you fell.

verb
8
1
Of an inhumanly cruel nature; fierce.

Fell hordes.

adjective
3
0
Capable of destroying; lethal.

A fell blow.

adjective
2
0
To strike down, kill, destroy.

verb
2
0
Dire; sinister.

By some fell chance.

adjective
1
0
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To cause to fall; knock down.

To fell an opponent with a blow.

verb
1
0
To cut down (a tree or trees)
verb
1
0
Fierce; terrible; cruel.
adjective
1
0
Deadly.
adjective
1
0
Simple past tense of fall.
verb
1
0
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Of a strong and cruel nature; eagre and unsparing; grim; fierce; ruthless; savage.

One fell swoop.

adjective
1
0
(UK dialectal, Scotland) Strong and fiery; biting; keen; sharp; pungent; clever.
adjective
1
0
To sew or finish (a seam) with the raw edges flattened, turned under, and stitched down.
verb
0
0
The timber cut down in one season.
noun
0
0
A felled seam.
noun
0
0
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(scots) Sharp and biting.
adjective
0
0
The hide of an animal; a pelt.
noun
0
0
A thin membrane directly beneath the hide.
noun
0
0
(chiefly british) An upland stretch of open country; a moor.
noun
0
0
A barren or stony hill.
noun
0
0
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verb
0
0
(sewing) To turn over (the rough edge of a seam) and sew down flat on the underside.
verb
0
0
The trees cut down in one season.
noun
0
0
(sewing) A felled seam.
noun
0
0
An animal's hide or skin.
noun
0
0
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A thin membrane of connective tissue under the hide.
noun
0
0
A rocky or barren hill.
noun
0
0
A moor; down.
noun
0
0
To make something fall; especially to chop down a tree.
verb
0
0
That portion of a kilt, from the waist to the seat, where the pleats are stitched down.
noun
0
0
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An animal skin, hide.
noun
0
0
(textiles) The end of a web, formed by the last thread of the weft.
noun
0
0
(sewing) To stitch down a protruding flap of fabric, as a seam allowance, or pleat.
verb
0
0
(archaic except UK) A rocky ridge or chain of mountains.

noun
0
0
(archaic except UK) A wild field or upland moor.
noun
0
0
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adverb
0
0
Gall; anger; melancholy.
noun
0
0
(mining) The finer portions of ore which go through the meshes when the ore is sorted by sifting.
noun
0
0
at
  • All at once.
idiom
1
0

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of fell

  • Middle English fel from Old English fell pel-3 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English fel from Old French variant of felon felon1

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English fel from Old Norse fell, fjall mountain, hill

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English fellen from Old English fellan, fyllan

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English fel, fell (“strong, fierce, terrible, cruel, angry”), from Old English *fel, *felo, *fæle (“cruel, savage, fierce”) (only in compounds, wælfel (“bloodthirsty”), ealfelo (“evil, baleful”), ælfæle (“very dire”), etc.), from Proto-Germanic *faluz (“wicked, cruel, terrifying”), from Proto-Indo-European *pol- (“to pour, flow, swim, fly”). Cognate with Old Frisian fal (“cruel”), Old Dutch fel (“wrathful, cruel, bad, base”), Danish fæl (“disgusting, hideous, ghastly, grim”), Middle High German vālant (“imp”). See felon.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English fellen, from Old English fellan, fiellan (“to cause to fall, strike down, fell, cut down, throw down, defeat, destroy, kill, tumble, cause to stumble”), from Proto-Germanic *fallijaną (“to fell, to cause to fall”), causative of Proto-Germanic *fallaną (“to fall”), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)pōl- (“to fall”). Cognate with Dutch vellen (“to fell, cut down”), German fällen (“to fell”), Norwegian felle (“to fell”).

    From Wiktionary

  • From Old Norse fell, fjall (“rock, mountain”), from Proto-Germanic *felzą, *fel(e)zaz, *falisaz (compare German Felsen 'boulder, cliff', Middle Low German vels 'hill, mountain'), from Proto-Indo-European *pelso (compare Irish aile 'boulder, cliff', Latin Palatium, Ancient Greek palléa, pélla 'stone', Pashto parša 'id.', Sanskrit pāşāņá 'id.')

    From Wiktionary

  • Middle English fell (“hide, skin, fell”), from Old English fell (“hide, skin, pelt”), from Proto-Germanic *fellą (compare West Frisian fel, Dutch, vel, German Fell), from Proto-Indo-European *pélno 'skin, animal hide' (compare Latin pellis 'skin', Lithuanian plėnė 'skin', Russian plená 'pelt', Albanian plah 'to cover', Ancient Greek péllas 'skin').

    From Wiktionary