Savage definition

săvĭj
A member of a people regarded as primitive, uncivilized, brutal, or fierce.
noun
31
7
To attack without restraint or pity.

The critics savaged the new play.

verb
20
6
A member of a preliterate culture, often having a tribal way of life.
noun
17
6
To assault ferociously.
verb
13
4
Wild, uncultivated, rugged, etc.

A savage jungle.

adjective
13
4
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Without civilization; primitive; barbarous.

A savage tribe.

adjective
7
3
Cruel; pitiless.
adjective
4
2
Extreme in strength or degree.

Savage heat.

adjective
3
1
Lacking polish; crude; rude.
adjective
4
3
The definition of savage is something wild, untamed or primitive.

An example of savage used as an adjective is a savage beast that lives in the jungle.

adjective
2
1
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Vicious or merciless; brutal.

A savage form of warfare.

adjective
2
1
Not civilized; barbaric.

A savage people.

adjective
1
1
Characterized by or showing hostility; unforgiving.

Savage criticism.

adjective
1
1

Savage manners.

adjective
1
1

Savage beasts.

A savage spirit.

adjective
1
1
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He gave the dog a savage kick.

The woman was killed in a savage manner.

adjective
1
1
(pejorative) An uncivilized or feral human; a barbarian.
noun
1
1
(figuratively) A defiant person.
noun
1
1
To attack or assault someone or something ferociously or without restraint.
verb
1
1
(figuratively) To criticise vehemently.

His latest film was savaged by most reviewers.

verb
1
1
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A crude, boorish person.
noun
3
4
Furious; ill-tempered.
adjective
2
3
Not domesticated or cultivated; wild.

A savage animal; the savage jungle.

adjective
1
2

A savage wilderness.

adjective
1
2
(UK, slang) Unpleasant or unfair.

- I'll see you in detention.- Ah, savage!

adjective
0
1
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(of an animal) To attack with the teeth.
verb
0
2
Fierce; ferocious; untamed.

A savage tiger.

adjective
0
3
To attack in a violent or brutal way.
verb
0
3
A fierce, brutal person.
noun
1
6

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
savage
Plural:
savages

Adjective

Base Form:
savage
Superlative:
savagest

Origin of savage

  • Middle English sauvage from Old French from Late Latin salvāticus from Latin silvāticus of the woods, wild from silva forest

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old French sauvage, salvage (“wild, savage, untamed"), from Late Latin salvaticus, alteration of Latin silvaticus (“wild"; literally, "of the woods"), from silva (“forest", "grove").

    From Wiktionary