Wolf meaning

wo͝olf
The definition of a wolf is any of the wild canine carnivores, or a fierce or greedy person.

An example of a wolf is the gray wolf.

An example of a wolf is a person who goes to extreme measures to get what she wants.

noun
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2
A man who habitually makes aggressive sexual advances to women.
noun
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3
One that is regarded as predatory, rapacious, and fierce.
noun
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1
Wolf is defined as to eat quickly and in great quantities.

An example of wolf is to ingest three burgers, three hot dogs and a large order of fries in minutes.

verb
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2
The destructive larva of any of various moths, beetles, or flies.
noun
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1
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To eat greedily or voraciously.
verb
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To eat ravenously, as a wolf does.
verb
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1759-1824; Ger. classical scholar.
proper name
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1860-1903; Austrian composer.
proper name
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A man who makes amorous advances on many women.
noun
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(music) A wolf tone or wolf note; an unpleasant tone produced when a note matches the natural resonating frequency of the body of a musical instrument, the quality of which may be likened to the howl of a wolf.

This cello has a terrible wolf on the D string around 'F'.

noun
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One of the destructive, and usually hairy, larvae of several species of beetles and grain moths.

The bee wolf.

noun
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(figuratively) Any very ravenous, rapacious, or destructive person or thing; especially, want; starvation.

They toiled hard to keep the wolf from the door.

noun
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A white worm, or maggot, which infests granaries.
noun
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noun
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Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster's Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
noun
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To devour; to gobble; to eat (something) voraciously.
verb
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pronoun
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A large wild canid of certain subspecies of Canis lupus.
noun
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1
wolf at the door
  • Creditors or a creditor.
idiom
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wolf in sheep's clothing
  • One who feigns congeniality while actually holding malevolent intentions.
idiom
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cry wolf
  • To give a false alarm.
idiom
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keep the wolf from the door
  • To provide the necessities of life in sufficient quantity to prevent privation.
idiom
1
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wolf in sheep's clothing
  • A person who hides malicious intent under a benign manner.
idiom
1
0

Origin of wolf

  • Middle English from Old English wulf wl̥kwo- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English wolf, from Old English wulf, Æ¿ulf, from Proto-Germanic *wulfaz (compare West Frisian and Dutch wolf, German Wolf, Danish ulv), from Proto-Indo-European *wĺ̥kÊ·os; akin to Sanskrit वृक (vṛ́ka), Persian گرگ (gorg), Lithuanian vilkas, Russian волк (volk), Albanian ujk, Latin lupus, Greek λύκος (lýkos), Tocharian B walkwe.

    From Wiktionary