Down Definition

doun
downed, downing, downs, downest
adverb
From a higher to a lower place; toward the ground.
Webster's New World
Toward, to, or on the ground, floor, or bottom.
Tripped and fell down.
American Heritage
In, on, or to a lower position or level; specif., to a sitting or reclining position.
Webster's New World
In or to a place thought of as lower or below; often, specif., southward.
To go down to Florida.
Webster's New World
Downstairs.
Let's go down and get some breakfast.
American Heritage
Synonyms:
Antonyms:
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adjective
downest
Descending; directed toward a lower position.
Webster's New World
In a lower place; on the ground.
Webster's New World
Reduced; diminished.
The wind is down.
American Heritage
Gone, brought, pulled, etc. down.
Webster's New World
Depressing or downbeat.
A down atmosphere.
Webster's New World
Antonyms:
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preposition
Down or downward, along, through, into, or upon.
Down the street, down the chimney, down the river, down the stairs.
Webster's New World
In a sequential or temporal sequence.
Knowledge passed down the ages.
American Heritage
Along the course of.
Walking down the street.
American Heritage
In or at.
The cans are stored down cellar.
American Heritage

From the higher end to the lower of.

The ball rolled down the hill.
Wiktionary
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noun
downs
A downward movement or depressed condition; defeat, misfortune, etc.
Webster's New World
A feeling of sadness or depression.
His frequent downs made him hard to live with.
American Heritage
A misfortune or difficulty.
Went through a lot of ups and downs before succeeding.
American Heritage
The declaring of the ball as down, or no longer in play.
Webster's New World
One of four consecutive plays in which a team, in order to keep possession of the ball, must either score or advance the ball at least ten yards.
Webster's New World
Synonyms:
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verb
downed, downing, downs
To put, bring, get, throw, or knock down.
Webster's New World
To defeat, as in a game.
Webster's New World
To gulp or eat rapidly.
Webster's New World
To go, come, or get down.
Webster's New World
To put (the ball) out of play by touching it to the ground or stepping out of bounds.
American Heritage
Antonyms:
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proper name
Former county of E Northern Ireland: c. 952 sq mi (2,466 sq km)
Webster's New World
District in E Northern Ireland, in the S part of the former county: 249 sq mi (645 sq km)
Webster's New World
pronoun
One of the counties of Northern Ireland.
Wiktionary
affix
Down, downward.
Downhill.
Webster's New World
other

(Ireland: Away from the city): up.

Wiktionary

(Into a state of non-operation): up.

Wiktionary

(Rail transport: direction leading away from the principal terminus): up.

Wiktionary
Antonyms:
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idiom
down on
  • Hostile or negative toward; ill-disposed to:

    was down on jogging after his injury.

American Heritage
down on (one's) luck
  • Afflicted by misfortune.
American Heritage
down with
  • Used to express disapproval of someone or a wish to see someone removed from a position of authority:

    Down with the king!

American Heritage
down and out
  • knocked out
  • lacking enough money, shelter, a job, etc.; destitute or impoverished
Webster's New World
down on
  • hostile to; angry or annoyed with
Webster's New World
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Other Word Forms of Down

Noun

Singular:
down
Plural:
Downs

Adjective

Base Form:
down
Superlative:
downest

Idioms, Phrasal Verbs Related to Down

Origin of Down

  • Middle English doun, from Old English dūn, from British Celtic dunon 'hill; hillfort' (compare Welsh din 'hill', Irish dún 'hill, fort'), from Proto-Indo-European *dheue or dhwene. More at town; akin to dune.

    From Wiktionary

  • Middle English doun from Old English -dūne (as in ofdūne downwards) from dūne dative of dūn hill dheuə- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English doune from Old English dūn hill dheuə- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Old English dūne, aphetic form of adūne, from of dūne (“off the hill”).

    From Wiktionary

  • Middle English doun from Old Norse dūnn

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old Norse dún.

    From Wiktionary

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