Down meaning

doun
Down is defined as going lower.

An example of down is when you go on an elevator from the 10th floor to the first floor.

adverb
5
1
Down means the fluffy feathers of a bird.

An example of down is the feathers used in a comforter on a bed.

noun
5
1
To go or come down; descend.
verb
4
1
The definition of down is unhappy, sad or depressed.

An example of down is when you are crying because you broke up with your boyfriend.

adjective
3
1
Fine, soft, fluffy feathers forming the first plumage of a young bird and underlying the contour feathers in certain adult birds.
noun
3
1
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(baseball) Retired; out.

Two down in the last of the ninth.

adjective
1
0
Along the course of.

Walking down the street.

preposition
1
0
In or at.

The cans are stored down cellar.

preposition
1
0
(football) Any of a series of four plays in American football or three plays in Canadian football during which a team must advance at least ten yards to retain possession of the ball.
noun
1
0
To bring, put, strike, or throw down.

Downed his opponent in the first round.

verb
1
0
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To swallow hastily; gulp.

Downed the glass of water.

verb
1
0
(football) To put (the ball) out of play by touching it to the ground or stepping out of bounds.
verb
1
0
(botany) A covering of soft, short hairs, as on some leaves or fruit.
noun
1
0
A soft, silky, or feathery substance, such as the first growth of a human beard.
noun
1
0
An expanse of rolling, grassy, treeless upland used for grazing.
noun
1
0
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Any of several breeds of sheep having short wool, originally bred in the Downs of southern England.
noun
1
0
From a higher to a lower place; toward the ground.
adverb
1
0
In, on, or to a lower position or level; specif., to a sitting or reclining position.
adverb
1
0
Below the horizon.
adverb
1
0
From an earlier to a later period or person.

Down through the years.

adverb
1
0
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From the higher end to the lower of.

The ball rolled down the hill.

preposition
1
0
Into a low or dejected emotional condition.
adverb
0
0
Into a low or prostrate physical condition.

To come down with a cold.

adverb
0
0
In or into an inferior position or condition.

Held down by harsh laws.

adverb
0
0
To a lower amount, value, or bulk.

To come down in price.

adverb
0
0
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In a serious or earnest manner.

To get down to work.

adverb
0
0
Completely; to the full extent.

Loaded down.

adverb
0
0
In cash or as a down payment.

Fifty dollars down and the remainder in installments.

adverb
0
0
In writing; on record.

Take down his name.

adverb
0
0
In a way that renders something or someone rejected or defeated.

Vote a measure down, shout someone down in an argument.

adverb
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0
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Descending; directed toward a lower position.
adjective
0
0
In a lower place; on the ground.
adjective
0
0
Gone, brought, pulled, etc. down.
adjective
0
0
Dejected; discouraged.
adjective
0
0
Prostrate; ill.
adjective
0
0
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Completed; finished.

Four down, six to go.

adjective
0
0
Inoperative.

The computer is down.

adjective
0
0
Characterized by low or falling prices.
adjective
0
0
Down or downward, along, through, into, or upon.

Down the street, down the chimney, down the river, down the stairs.

preposition
0
0
To gulp or eat rapidly.
verb
0
0
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(rare) To go, come, or get down.
verb
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0
A downward movement or depressed condition; defeat, misfortune, etc.
noun
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0
(slang) A barbiturate or other depressant drug; downer.
noun
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0
Soft, fluffy feathers, as the outer covering on young birds or an inner layer of feathers on adult birds.
noun
0
0
Soft, fine hair or hairy growth.
noun
0
0
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An expanse of open, high, grassy land.
noun
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0
Former county of E Northern Ireland: c. 952 sq mi (2,466 sq km)
proper name
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0
(place) District in E Northern Ireland, in the S part of the former county: 249 sq mi (645 sq km)
proper name
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0
Down, downward.

Downhill.

affix
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0
Fine, soft, fluffy feathers forming the first plumage of a young bird and underlying the contour feathers in certain adult birds.
noun
0
0
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A soft, silky, or feathery substance, such as the first growth of a human beard.
noun
0
0
A computer that ceases to operate due to hardware or software failure. A communications line is down when it is unable to transfer data.
0
0
(archaic except in place-names) Hill, rolling grassland.

Churchill Downs, Upson Downs (from Auntie Mame, by Patrick Dennis).

noun
0
0
(usually plural) Field, especially for racing.
noun
0
0
(UK, chiefly in the plural) A tract of poor, sandy, undulating or hilly land near the sea, covered with fine turf which serves chiefly for the grazing of sheep.
noun
0
0
A road for shipping in the English Channel or Straits of Dover, near Deal, employed as a naval rendezvous in time of war.
noun
0
0
(comparable) From a higher position to a lower one; downwards.

The cat jumped down from the table.

adverb
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0
(comparable) At a lower place or position.

His place is farther down the road.

adverb
0
0
South (as south is at the bottom of typical maps).

I went down to Miami for a conference.

adverb
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0
(Ireland) Away from the city (even if the location is to the North).

He went down to Cavan. down on the farm; down country.

adverb
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0
Into a state of non-operation.

The computer has been shut down. They closed the shop down. The up escalator is down.

adverb
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0
(rail transport) The direction leading away from the principal terminus, away from milepost zero.
adverb
0
0
(sentence substitute) Get down.

Down, boy! (said to a dog)

adverb
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0
(UK, academia) Away from Oxford or Cambridge.

He's gone back down to Newcastle for Christmas.

adverb
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0
From a remoter or higher antiquity.
adverb
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0
From a greater to a less bulk, or from a thinner to a thicker consistence.

To boil down in cookery, or in making decoctions.

adverb
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0
From less to greater detail.
adverb
0
0
(From a higher position to a lower one): up.
0
0
(At a lower place): up.
0
0
(Ireland: Away from the city): up.
0
0
(Into a state of non-operation): up.
0
0
(Rail transport: direction leading away from the principal terminus): up.
0
0
From one end to another of.

The bus went down the street.

They walked down the beach holding hands.

preposition
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0
Depressed, feeling low.

So, things got you down? / Is Rodney Dangerfield giving you no respect? / Well, bunky, cheer up!

adjective
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0
On a lower level than before.

The stock market is down.

Prices are down.

adjective
0
0
Having a lower score than an opponent.

They are down by 3-0 with just 5 minutes to play.

He was down by a bishop and a pawn after 15 moves.

At 5-1 down, she produced a great comeback to win the set on a tiebreak.

adjective
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0
(colloquial) With "on", negative about, hostile to.

Ever since Nixon, I've been down on Republicans.

adjective
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(not comparable, US, slang) Relaxed about, accepting of.

Are you down to hang out at the mall, Jamal?

As long as you're down with helping me pick a phone, Tyrone.

adjective
0
0
(not comparable) Inoperable; out of order; out of service.

The system is down.

adjective
0
0
Finished (of a task); defeated or dealt with (of an opponent or obstacle)

Two down and three to go. (Two tasks completed and three more still to be done.)

adjective
0
0
Committed to memory; memorised, in phrases like.

It's two weeks until opening night and our lines are still not down yet.

adjective
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0
To drink or swallow, especially without stopping before the vessel containing the liquid is empty.

He downed an ale and ordered another.

verb
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0
To cause to come down; to knock down or subdue.

The storm downed several old trees along the highway.

verb
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0
(pocket billiards) To put a ball in a pocket; to pot a ball.

He downed two balls on the break.

verb
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0
(American football) To bring a play to an end by touching the ball to the ground or while it is on the ground.

He downed it at the seven-yard line.

verb
0
0
To write off; to make fun of.
verb
0
0
A negative aspect; a downer.

I love almost everything about my job. The only down is that I can't take Saturdays off.

noun
0
0
(dated) A grudge (on someone).
noun
0
0
An act of swallowing an entire drink in one.
noun
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0
(American football) A single play, from the time the ball is snapped (the start) to the time the whistle is blown (the end) when the ball is down, or is downed.

I bet after the third down, the kicker will replace the quarterback on the field.

noun
0
0
(crosswords) A clue whose solution runs vertically in the grid.

I haven't solved 12 or 13 across, but I've got most of the downs.

noun
0
0
Soft, fluffy immature feathers which grow on young birds. Used as insulating material in duvets, sleeping bags and jackets.
noun
0
0
(botany) The pubescence of plants; the hairy crown or envelope of the seeds of certain plants, such as the thistle.
noun
0
0
The soft hair of the face when beginning to appear.
noun
0
0
That which is made of down, as a bed or pillow; that which affords ease and repose, like a bed of down.
noun
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0
To cover, ornament, line, or stuff with down.

verb
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0
One of the counties of Northern Ireland.
pronoun
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0
down on
  • Hostile or negative toward; ill-disposed to:
    Was down on jogging after his injury.
idiom
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0
down on (one's) luck
  • Afflicted by misfortune.
idiom
0
0
down with
  • Used to express disapproval of someone or a wish to see someone removed from a position of authority:
    Down with the king!.
idiom
0
0
down and out
  • knocked out
  • lacking enough money, shelter, a job, etc.; destitute or impoverished
idiom
0
0
down on
  • hostile to; angry or annoyed with
idiom
0
0
down to the ground
  • thoroughly; completely
idiom
0
0
down with
  • overthrow! do away with!
    down with the king!.
  • in approval or acceptance of, in agreement with, enthusiastic about, etc.
    I'm down with our new councilman.
idiom
0
0
have something down
  • to know or have memorized thoroughly
idiom
0
0

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

down on
down on
down to the ground
have something down

Origin of down

  • Middle English doun from Old English -dūne (as in ofdūne downwards) from dūne dative of dūn hill dheuə- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English doune from Old English dūn hill dheuə- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English doun from Old Norse dūnn

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English doun, from Old English dūn, from British Celtic dunon 'hill; hillfort' (compare Welsh din 'hill', Irish dún 'hill, fort'), from Proto-Indo-European *dheue or dhwene. More at town; akin to dune.

    From Wiktionary

  • Old English dūne, aphetic form of adūne, from of dūne (“off the hill”).

    From Wiktionary

  • From Old Norse dún.

    From Wiktionary