Rude meaning

ro͝od
Crude or rough in form or workmanship.

A rude hut.

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Barbarous or ignorant.

Rude savages.

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Rough, violent, or harsh.

A rude awakening.

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Harsh in sound; discordant; not musical.

Rude tones.

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Having or showing little skill or development; primitive.

Rude drawings.

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Not carefully worked out or finished; not precise.

A rude appraisal.

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Sturdy; robust; rugged.

Rude health.

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Which do you find the most rude? Staring, pointing, farting loudly, whistling, or asking how someone died?

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Hearty, vigorous; found particularly in the phrase rude health.
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Unpleasantly forceful or harsh.

Faced rude winds; received a rude shock.

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Discourteous; unmannerly.

A rude reply.

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The definition of rude is behavior that does not conform to what society says would be polite or good manners or inappropriate subjects of discussion.

An example of rude is bumping into someone and not saying "Excuse me."

An example of rude is when you engage in an inappropriate discussion about sex.

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Ill-mannered, discourteous, or insulting.

Was offended by his rude behavior.

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Vigorous or robust.

In rude health.

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Lacking education or refinement.
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Origin of rude

  • Middle English from Old French unrefined, harsh from Latin rudis in a natural state, crude, ignorant
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English, from Old French, from Latin rudis (“rough, raw, rude, wild, untilled").
    From Wiktionary