Exact meaning

ĭg-zăkt
The definition of exact is completely true, following all guidelines or precise.

An example of something exact is a measurement of water that is completely accurate.

adjective
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To inflict (vengeance or punishment, for example).
verb
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Characterized by, requiring, or capable of accuracy of detail; very accurate; methodical; correct.

An exact science.

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Strictly and completely in accord with fact; not deviating from truth or reality.

An exact account; an exact replica; your exact words.

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Characterized by accurate measurements or inferences with small margins of error; not approximate.

An exact figure; an exact science.

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Characterized by strict adherence to standards or rules.

An exact speaker.

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To force the payment or yielding of; extort.

Exact tribute from a conquered people.

verb
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Not deviating in form or content; without variation; precise.

An exact replica.

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Being the very (one specified or understood)

The exact spot where I put it.

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Strict; severe; rigorous.

An exact disciplinarian.

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To force payment of; extort.
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To demand and get by authority or force; insist on.
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To call for; make necessary; require.
verb
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Precisely agreeing with a standard, a fact, or the truth; perfectly conforming; neither exceeding nor falling short in any respect.

The clock keeps exact time.

He paid the exact debt.

An exact copy of a letter.

Exact accounts.

adjective
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Habitually careful to agree with a standard, a rule, or a promise; accurate; methodical; punctual.

A man exact in observing an appointment.

In my doings I was exact.

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Precisely or definitely conceived or stated; strict.
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(algebra, of a sequence of groups connected by homomorphisms) Such that the kernel of one homomorphism is the image of the preceding one.
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To demand and enforce the payment or performance of.

To exact tribute, fees, or obedience.

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To make desirable or necessary.
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To forcibly obtain or produce.

To exact revenge.

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Origin of exact

  • Latin exāctus past participle of exigere to weigh out, demand ex- ex- agere to weigh ag- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old French, from Medieval Latin exactare, reg., from Latin exactus, perfect passive participle of exigō (“demand, claim as due" or "measure by a standard, weigh, test”), from ex (“out”) + agō (“drive”).

    From Wiktionary