Squeeze meaning

skwēz
To squeeze is defined as to compress or put pressure on something particularly to make room or get something out.

An example of to squeeze is to press on a ketchup packet to get out every last drop.

verb
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To exert pressure.

Squeezed until my hand hurt.

verb
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An amount squeezed out.

A squeeze of lemon.

noun
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1
(games) To force (an opponent) to use a potentially winning card in a trick he or she cannot take in bridge.
verb
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Pressure or intimidation to comply with a demand, as to make an extortion payment.

Thugs who put the squeeze on shopkeepers.

noun
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The definition of a squeeze is the act of pressing things together.

An example of a squeeze is a hug.

An example of a squeeze is putting ten people in a church pew that is designed for eight people.

noun
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A group crowded together; a crush.
noun
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To yield or give way to pressure.

A wet sponge squeezes easily.

verb
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To give way under pressure.

The rubber duck squeaks when it squeezes.

verb
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(slang) One's primary romantic partner or sweetheart.
noun
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Financial pressure caused by shortages or narrowing economic margins.
noun
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(games) A forced discard of a potentially winning card in bridge.
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(baseball) A squeeze play.
noun
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To press hard or closely; exert pressure on, esp. from two or more sides; compress.
verb
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To force (into, out, through, etc.) by or as by pressing.
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To get, extract, or extort by force or unfair means.
verb
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To oppress with exactions, burdensome taxes, etc.
verb
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To put pressure or bring influence to bear upon (someone) to do a certain thing, as to pay money, etc.
verb
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To embrace closely; hug.
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(baseball) To score (a run) or cause (a runner) to score by a squeeze play.
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(bridge) To force (an opponent) to discard a card needed to defeat the contract.
verb
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To exert pressure.
verb
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To force one's way by pushing or pressing (in, out, through, etc.)
verb
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A squeezing or being squeezed; hard or close pressure.
noun
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The state of being closely pressed or packed; crush.
noun
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A period or situation marked by scarcity, hardship, insecurity, etc.
noun
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A facsimile impression made by pressing a soft substance onto something, as a coin or inscription.
noun
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A quantity of something extracted by squeezing.
noun
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(informal) Pressure or influence brought to bear, as in extortion.
noun
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noun
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(slang) A sweetheart or lover.
noun
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To apply pressure to from two or more sides at once.

I squeezed the ball between my hands.

Please don't squeeze the toothpaste tube in the middle.

verb
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(intransitive) To fit into a tight place.

I managed to squeeze the car into that parking space.

Can you squeeze through that gap?

verb
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To remove something with difficulty, or apparent difficulty.

He squeezed some money out of his wallet.

verb
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To put in a difficult position by presenting two or more choices.

I'm being squeezed between my job and my volunteer work.

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(figuratively) To oppress with hardships, burdens, or taxes; to harass.
verb
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(baseball) To attempt to score a runner from third by bunting.

Jones squeezed in Smith with a perfect bunt.

verb
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A difficult position.

I'm in a tight squeeze right now when it comes to my free time.

noun
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A traversal of a narrow passage.

It was a tight squeeze, but I got through to the next section of the cave.

noun
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A hug or other affectionate grasp.

A gentle squeeze on the arm.

noun
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(slang) A romantic partner.

I want to be your main squeeze.

noun
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(baseball) The act of bunting in an attempt to score a runner from third.

The game ended in exciting fashion with a failed squeeze.

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(epigraphy) An impression of an inscription formed by pressing wet paper onto the surface and peeling off when dry.

The light not being good enough for photography, I took a squeeze of the stone.

noun
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(card games) A play that forces an opponent to discard a card that gives up one or more tricks.
noun
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(archaic) A bribe or fee paid to a middleman, especially in China.
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To force one's way.

Squeeze through a crowd; squeeze into a tight space.

verb
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squeeze through
  • to succeed, survive, get through, etc. by a narrow margin or with difficulty
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

squeeze through

Origin of squeeze

  • Probably alteration of obsolete quease to press from Middle English queisen from Old English cwȳsan

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From earlier squize, squise (whence also English dialectal squizzen and squeege), first attested around 1600, probably an alteration of quease (which is attested since 1550), from Middle English queisen (“to squeeze"), from Old English cwÄ“san, cwȳsan (“to crush, squeeze"), of unknown origin, perhaps imitative (compare Swedish qväsa, kväsa (“to squeeze, bruise, crush; quell"), Dutch kwetsen (“to injure, hurt"), German quetschen (“to squeeze")). Compare also Old Provençal esquichar (“to press, squeeze"). The slang expression "to put the squeeze on (someone or something)", meaning "to exert influence", is from 1711. The baseball term "squeeze play" is first recorded 1905. "Main squeeze" ("most important person") is attested from 1896, the specific meaning "one's sweetheart, lover" is attested by 1980.

    From Wiktionary