Rice meaning

rīs
The starchy grain of this plant, used as a staple food throughout the world.
noun
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To sieve (food) to the consistency of rice.
verb
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An aquatic cereal grass (esp. Oryza sativa) grown widely in warm climates, esp. in East Asia.
noun
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The starchy seeds or grains of this grass, used as food.
noun
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A cereal grass (Oryza sativa) that is cultivated extensively in warm climates for its edible grain.
noun
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To put (soft foods, as cooked potatoes) through a ricer.
verb
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anagrams
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(person) (born Elmer Reizenstein) 1892-1967; U.S. playwright.
proper name
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(uncountable) Cereal plants, Oryza sativa of the grass family whose seeds are used as food.
noun
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A specific variety of this plant.
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(uncountable) The seeds of this plant used as food.
noun
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To squeeze through a ricer; to mash or make into rice-sized pieces.
verb
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To throw rice at a person (usually at a wedding).
verb
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To belittle a government emissary or similar on behalf of a more powerful militaristic state.
verb
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To harvest wild rice Zinzania sp.
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(medicine) Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation; treatment method for soft tissue injuries.
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Origin of rice

  • Middle English from Old French ris from Old Italian riso from Latin oryza from Greek oruza of Indo-Iranian origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English rys, from Old French ris, from Old Italian riso, risi, from Byzantine Greek ὄρυζα (óryza), ὄρυζον (óryzon). This is usually held to be a borrowing from Old Iranian (cf. Old Persian brizi, Pashto wrižē, Kurdish birinc), in turn probably borrowed from Sanskrit व्रीहि (vrÄ«hí). The Sanskrit term is either a loan from Dravidian - compare Proto-Dravidian *wariñci (“rice") - or, according to Witzel, borrowed from an unknown South Asian, possibly Austroasiatic, source, with the Dravidian word being an independent borrowing of another variant. Old Tamil அரிசி (arici), from earlier *ariki, is not the source of the Greek word, however, according to Krishnamurti (2003) apud Witzel (2009). In contrast, Witzel (1999) had maintained, following Southworth (1979), that the Greek term goes back to Old Tamil arici - itself from an older form *ariki, an early (ca. 1500 BC) borrowing from Munda according to Southworth (1988).

    From Wiktionary