Clasp meaning

klăsp
To hold in a tight embrace.
verb
3
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Clasp means to hold or grip tightly, or attach two or more things together.

An example of clasp is keeping a firm hold on a child's hand when approaching a busy street.

An example of clasp is a mountain climber hooking a line to the side of a mountain for support.

verb
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A fastening, such as a hook or buckle, used to hold two or more objects or parts together.
noun
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To fasten with or as if with a clasp.
verb
2
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The definition of a clasp is something that holds two things together, or a firm hold.

An example of a clasp is a belt buckle.

An example of a clasp is a solid handshake.

noun
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A fastening, as a hook, buckle, or catch, to hold two things or parts together.
noun
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The act of holding or grasping; embrace.
noun
1
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A grip of the hand.
noun
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To fasten with or as with a clasp.
verb
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To hold tightly with the arms or hands; grasp firmly; embrace.
verb
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To grip with the hand.
verb
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A fastener or holder, particularly one that clasps.

I always have a hard time working the clasp on this necklace!

noun
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A small metal bar or other device attached to the ribbon of a military decoration to indicate the action or service for which it was awarded or an additional award of the same medal.
noun
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A metal bar attached to the ribbon of a military decoration to show a subsequent award of the same medal or to specify the type or place of service.
noun
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To entwine about; cling to.
verb
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(in the singular) An embrace, a grasp, or handshake.

He took her hand in a firm clasp.

noun
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To take hold of; to grasp; to grab tightly.

They clasped hands and parted as friends.

verb
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To shut or fasten together with, or as if with, a clasp.
verb
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To grip firmly in or with the hand; grasp.
verb
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1

Origin of clasp

  • Middle English claspe probably ultimately from Old English clyppan to grasp, hold

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Noun dated in the 13th Century CE and verb dated in the late 14th Century CE; from claspe, possible modification of clapse, which is from Old English clyppan (“to grasp”). Related to enclasp (“embrace, hold tightly in one's arms”).

    From Wiktionary