Lock meaning

lŏk
To invest (funds) in such a way that they cannot easily be converted into cash.
verb
5
1
To become entangled or jammed; interlock.
verb
5
2
To become fastened by or as if by means of a lock.

The door locks automatically when shut.

verb
3
2
To become rigid or immobile.

The mechanism tends to lock in cold weather.

verb
3
3
A locking together; jam.
noun
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To arrange or secure (an interest rate) for a loan.
verb
2
1
To pass through a lock or locks in a waterway.
verb
2
1
A small wisp or tuft, as of wool or cotton.
noun
2
1
A mechanical device furnished with a bolt and usually a spring, for fastening a door, strongbox, etc. by means of a key or combination.
noun
2
1
Anything that fastens something else and prevents it from opening, turning, etc.
noun
2
1
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A device operated by a key, combination, or keycard and used, as on a door, for holding, closing, or securing.
noun
1
0
A section of a waterway, such as a canal, closed off with gates, in which vessels in transit are raised or lowered by raising or lowering the water level of that section.
noun
1
0
A mechanism in a firearm for exploding the charge.
noun
1
0
An enclosed part of a canal, waterway, etc. equipped with gates so that the level of the water can be changed to raise or lower boats from one level to another.
noun
1
0
The mechanism of a firearm used to explode the ammunition charge; gunlock.
noun
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0
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noun
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0
(slang) A certainty; sure thing.

Our team is a lock to win the title.

noun
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0
(wrestling) A hold in which a part of the opponent's body is firmly gripped.

Headlock.

noun
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To fasten (a door, trunk, etc.) by means of a lock.
verb
1
0
To keep from going in or out by or as by means of a lock; shut (up, in or out); confine.

Locked in jail.

verb
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To fit closely; link; intertwine.

To lock arms.

verb
1
0
To embrace tightly.
verb
1
0
To jam or force together so as to make immovable.

Locked gears, locked brakes.

verb
1
0
To put in a fixed position.

A throttle locked in the idle position.

verb
1
0
To make (a bid, etc.) firm, definite, or final.
verb
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To equip (a canal, etc.) with a lock or locks.
verb
1
0
To move or pass (a ship) through a lock.
verb
1
0
(printing) To fasten (type elements) in a chase or on the bed of a press by means of quoins.
verb
1
0
To become locked.
verb
1
0
To be capable of being locked.
verb
1
0
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To intertwine or interlock; link together.
verb
1
0
To close tightly and firmly.

The dog's jaws locked on its prey.

verb
1
0
To jam, as gears.
verb
1
0
To pass through the locks of a canal.
verb
1
0
A curl, tress, or ringlet of hair.
noun
1
0
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The definition of a lock is a device or a tool for holding or securing, or an enclosed canal with a series of gates that raise and lower ships to the level of adjoining water.

An example of a lock is a hole for a key on a doorknob.

An example of a lock is a mechanical device in the Panama Canal that uses gates to enclose changing water levels.

noun
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0
Lock is defined as to secure, trap or fasten.

An example of to lock is to trap someone in a basement.

verb
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(old poet.) The hair of the head.
noun
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A tuft of wool, cotton, etc.
noun
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A surname​.
pronoun
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(no longer productive) Action or proceeding, practice, ritual.
suffix
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An interlocking or entanglement of elements or parts.
noun
0
1
To confine or exclude by or as if by means of a lock.

Locked the dog in for the night; locked the criminal up in a cell.

verb
0
1
To fix in place so that movement or escape is impossible; hold fast.

The ship was locked in the ice through the winter. She felt that she had become locked into a binding agreement.

verb
0
1
To clasp or link firmly; intertwine or interlock.

Locked arms and walked away.

verb
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1
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To bind in close struggle or battle.

The two dogs were locked in combat.

verb
0
1
lock horns
  • To become embroiled in conflict.
idiom
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(slang) lock lips
  • To engage in a long kiss.
idiom
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0
lock, stock, and barrel
  • To the greatest or most complete extent; wholly:
    An estate that was auctioned off lock, stock, and barrel.
idiom
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under lock and key
  • Securely locked up.
idiom
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have a lock on
  • to be sure of winning, gaining, or controlling
    The other party has a lock on that Senate seat.
idiom
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lock away
  • to store or safeguard in a locked box, container, etc.
idiom
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0
locked in
  • displaying total concentration
idiom
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lock on
  • to track and automatically follow (a target), as by radar
idiom
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0
lock out
  • to shut out by or as by locking the door against
  • to keep (workers) from a place of employment in seeking to force terms upon them
idiom
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0
lock, stock, and barrel
  • completely; entirely
idiom
0
0
lock up
  • to fasten the doors of (a house, etc.) by means of locks
  • to enclose or store in a locked container
  • to put in jail
  • to make certain to have the result one wants
    To have an election locked up.
idiom
0
0
under lock and key
  • locked up; safely put away
idiom
0
0

Origin of lock

  • Middle English from Old English loc bolt, bar

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old English locc

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • The etymology of the suffix is the same as that of the noun lāc "play, sport", also "sacrifice, offering", corresponding to obsolete Modern English lake (dialectal laik) "sport, fun, glee, game", cognate to Gothic laiks "dance", Old Norse leikr "game, sport" and Old High German leih "play, song, melody" (> Old French lai "song, lyric, poem, lay"). Ultimately, the word descends from Proto-Germanic *laikaz. Old English līcian ("to please", Modern English like) is from the same root. In modern English, the noun has been reintroduced through the cognate Swedish lek as a specialist term referring to mating behaviour.

    From Wiktionary

  • Thus, the suffix originates as a second member in nominal compounds, and referred to "actions or proceedings, practice, ritual" identical with the noun lāc "play, sport, performance" (obsolete Modern English lake "fun, sport, glee", obsolete or dialectal Modern German Leich).

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English -lok, -lak, -lac, from Old English -lāc (suffix denoting activity or action), from Proto-Germanic *laiką (“play, sport, activity”), from Proto-Indo-European *leig-, *loig- (“to bounce, shake, make tremble”).

    From Wiktionary