Tuft meaning

tŭft
A short cluster of elongated strands, as of yarn, hair, or grass, attached at the base or growing close together.
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A dense clump, especially of trees or bushes.
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To furnish or ornament with tufts or a tuft.
verb
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To pass threads through the layers of (a quilt, mattress, or upholstery), securing the thread ends with a knot or button.
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To separate or form into tufts.
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To grow in a tuft.
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A bunch of hairs, feathers, grass, etc. growing closely together or attached at the base.
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Any similar cluster.
  • A clump of plants or trees.
  • The fluffy ball forming the end of any of the clusters of threads drawn tightly through a mattress, quilt, etc. to hold the padding in place.
  • A decorative button to which such a tuft is fastened.
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To provide or decorate with a tuft or tufts.
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To secure the padding of (a quilt, mattress, etc.) by regularly spaced tufts.
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To grow in or form into tufts.
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A bunch of feathers, grass or hair, etc., held together at the base.
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A cluster of threads drawn tightly through upholstery, a mattress or a quilt, etc., to secure and strengthen the padding.
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A small clump of trees or bushes.
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(historical) A gold tassel on the cap worn by titled undergraduates at English universities.
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(historical) A person entitled to wear such a tassel.
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To provide or decorate with a tuft or tufts.

verb
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To form into tufts.
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To secure and strengthen (a mattress, quilt, etc.) with tufts.
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(intransitive) To be formed into tufts.
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Origin of tuft

  • Middle English probably alteration of Old French tofe from Late Latin tufa helmet crest or of Germanic origin
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Middle English toft(e), from Middle French tofe, toffe 'tuft', from Late Latin (near Vegezio) tufa 'helmet crest', from Germanic (compare Old English ðūf 'tuft', Old Norse þúfa 'mound', Swedish tuva 'tussock, grassy hillock'), from Proto-Germanic *þūbÇ­, *þūbaz; akin to Latin tÅ«ber 'hump, swelling', Ancient Greek typhÄ“ 'cattail (used to stuff beds)'.
    From Wiktionary