Hook meaning

ho͝ok
A means of catching or ensnaring; a trap.
noun
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The definition of a hook is a bent piece of material used for hanging things or catching fish, or something intended to get attention.

An example of a hook is a metal piece hanging on the wall that you hang your coat on.

An example of a hook is an intriguing product ad that inspires you to learn more.

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Something shaped like a hook, especially:
  • A curved or barbed plant or animal part.
  • A short angled or curved line on a letter.
  • A sickle.
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A curve ball.
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A hook shot.
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To fasten by a hook.
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To pierce or gore with a hook.
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To make (a rug) by looping yarn through canvas with a type of hook.
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To pitch (a ball) with a curve.
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To shoot (a ball) in a hook shot.
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To impede the progress of (an opponent in ice hockey) by holding or restraining the player with one's stick, in violation of the rules.
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To bend like a hook.
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To fasten by means of a hook or a hook and eye.
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To work as a prostitute.
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A curved or bent piece of metal, wood, etc. used to catch, hold, or pull something.
  • A curved piece of wire or bone with a barbed end, for catching fish.
  • A curved piece of metal, wood, etc. fastened to a wall or chain at one end, used to hang things on, raise things up, etc.
    A coat hook.
  • A small metal catch inserted in a loop, or eye, to fasten clothes together.
  • An anchor.
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A curved metal implement for cutting grain, etc.
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Something shaped like a hook.
  • A curving cape or headland.
    Sandy Hook.
  • A sharp bend in a stream.
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A trap; snare.
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Something intended to attract attention or encourage involvement; specif., in popular music, a catchy, repeated phrase, verse, riff, etc.
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A short, sharp blow delivered with the arm bent at the elbow.
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To attach or fasten with or as with a hook, or a hook and eye.
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To take hold of with a hook.
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To catch with or as with a hook.
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To attack with the horns, as a bull; gore.
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To make into the shape of a hook.
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To make (a rug, wall hanging, etc.) by drawing strips of yarn or cloth with a hook through a canvas or burlap backing.
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To hit or throw (a ball) in a hook.
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To hit with a hook.
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To curve as a hook does.
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To be fastened with a hook or hooks.
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To be caught by a hook.
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To work as a prostitute.
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In programming, instructions that provide breakpoints for future expansion. Hooks may be changed to call some outside routine or function or may be places where additional processing is added. See also switch hook.
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An area in the message-handling mechanism of a computer system in which an application can install a subroutine to monitor the message traffic in the system. This application can also process certain kinds of messages before they can reach the targeted window procedure. Hooks significantly slow down computer systems because they increase the amount of processing that the system must perform for each message; therefore, they should be installed only when necessary. Microsoft Corporation. Hooks. [Online, 2004.] Microsoft Corporation Website. http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/default.asp?url=/library/enus/winui/winui/ windowsuserinterface/windowing/hooks.asp; http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/default.asp? url=/library/en-us/winui/WinUI/WindowsUserInterface/Windowing/Hooks/AboutHooks.asp.
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A rod bent into a curved shape, typically with one end free and the other end secured to a rope or other attachment.
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A fishhook, a barbed metal hook used for fishing.
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Any of various hook-shaped agricultural implements such as a billhook.
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That part of a hinge which is fixed to a post, and on which a door or gate hangs and turns.
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A loop shaped like a hook under certain written letters, e.g. g and j.
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A catchy musical phrase which forms the basis of a popular song.

The song's hook snared me.

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A brief, punchy opening statement intended to get attention from an audience, reader, or viewer, and make them want to continue to listen to a speech, read a book, or watch a play.
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A tie-in to a current event or trend that makes a news story or editorial relevant and timely.
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(informal) Removal or expulsion from a group or activity.

He is not handling this job, so we're giving him the hook.

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(cricket) A type of shot played by swinging the bat in a horizontal arc, hitting the ball high in the air to the leg side, often played to balls which bounce around head height.
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(baseball) A curveball.

He threw a hook in the dirt.

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(software) A feature, definition, or coding that enables future enhancements to happen compatibly or more easily.

We've added "user-defined" codepoints in several places and careful definitions of what to do with unknown message types as hooks in the standard to enable implementations to be both backward and forward compatible to future versions of the standard.

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(golf) A golf shot that (for the right-handed player) curves unintentionally to the left. See draw, slice, fade.
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(basketball) A basketball shot in which the offensive player, usually turned perpendicular to the basket, gently throws the ball with a sweeping motion of his arm in an upward arc with a follow-through which ends over his head. Also called hook shot.
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(boxing) A type of punch delivered with the arm rigid and partially bent and the fist travelling nearly horizontally mesially along an arc.

The heavyweight delivered a few powerful hooks that staggered his opponent.

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(slang) A jack (the playing card)
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(typography, rare) A háček.
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(Scrabble) An instance of playing a word perpendicular to a word already on the board, adding a letter to the start or the end of the word to form a new word.
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(bowling) A ball that is rolled in a curved line.
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(bridge, slang) A finesse.
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A snare; a trap.

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A field sown two years in succession.
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(in the plural) The projecting points of the thighbones of cattle; called also hook bones.
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To attach a hook to.

Hook the bag here, and the conveyor will carry it away.

verb
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To catch with a hook (hook a fish).

He hooked a snake accidentally, and was so scared he dropped his rod into the water.

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To ensnare someone, as if with a hook.

She's only here to try to hook a husband.

A free trial is a good way to hook customers.

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(UK, US, slang, archaic) To steal.
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To connect (hook into, hook together).

If you hook your network cable into the jack, you'll be on the network.

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(Usually in passive) To make addicted; to captivate.

He had gotten hooked on cigarettes in his youth.

I watched one episode of that TV series and now I'm hooked.

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(cricket, golf) To play a hook shot.
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(field hockey, ice hockey) To engage in the illegal maneuver of hooking (i.e., using the hockey stick to trip or block another player)

The opposing team's forward hooked me, but the referee didn't see it, so no penalty.

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(soccer) To swerve a ball; kick a ball so it swerves or bends.
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(intransitive, slang) To engage in prostitution.

I had a cheap flat in the bad part of town, and I could watch the working girls hooking from my bedroom window.

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(Scrabble) To play a word perpendicular to another word by adding a single letter to the existing word.
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(bridge, slang) To finesse.
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by hook or by crook
  • By whatever means possible, fair or unfair.
idiom
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get the hook
  • To be unceremoniously dismissed or terminated.
idiom
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hook, line, and sinker
  • Without reservation; completely:.
    Swallowed the excuse hook, line, and sinker.
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off the hook
  • Freed, as from blame or a vexatious obligation:.
    Let me off the hook with a mild reprimand.
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on (one's) own hook
  • By one's own efforts.
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by hook or by crook
  • In any way whatever; by any means, honest or dishonest.
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get the hook
  • To be discharged or dismissed: from the former practice of pulling incompetent actors off the stage with a long, hooked pole.
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hook, line, and sinker
  • Completely; altogether.
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hook up
  • To connect or attach with a hook or hooks.
  • To arrange and connect the parts of (a radio, etc.).
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off the hook
  • Out of trouble, embarrassment, or a state of burdensome responsibility.
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on one's own hook
  • By oneself; without getting help, advice, etc.
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Origin of hook

  • Middle English hok from Old English hōc keg- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English hoke, from Old English hōc, from Proto-Germanic *hōkaz (cf. West Frisian/Dutch hoek 'hook, angle, corner', Low German Hook, Huuk 'id.'), variant of *hakô (“hook”) (compare Dutch Low Saxon hoake (“hook”)). Probably ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *kog-, *keg-, *keng- (“peg, hook, claw”). More at hake.

    From Wiktionary