Hook Definition

ho͝ok
hooked, hooking, hooks
noun
hooks
A curved or bent piece of metal, wood, etc. used to catch, hold, or pull something.
Webster's New World
A curved metal implement for cutting grain, etc.
Webster's New World
A fishhook.
American Heritage
Something shaped like a hook.
Webster's New World
A sharp bend or curve, as in a river.
American Heritage
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verb
hooked, hooking, hooks
To snare.
American Heritage
To catch with or as with a hook.
Webster's New World
To be fastened with a hook or hooks.
Webster's New World
To be caught by a hook.
Webster's New World
To take hold of with a hook.
Webster's New World
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other
An area in the message-handling mechanism of a computer system in which an application can install a subroutine to monitor the message traffic in the system. This application can also process certain kinds of messages before they can reach the targeted window procedure. Hooks significantly slow down computer systems because they increase the amount of processing that the system must perform for each message; therefore, they should be installed only when necessary. Microsoft Corporation. Hooks. [Online, 2004.] Microsoft Corporation Website. http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/default.asp?url=/library/enus/winui/winui/ windowsuserinterface/windowing/hooks.asp; http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/default.asp? url=/library/en-us/winui/WinUI/WindowsUserInterface/Windowing/Hooks/AboutHooks.asp.
Webster's New World Hacker
idiom
by hook or by crook
  • By whatever means possible, fair or unfair.
American Heritage
get the hook
  • To be unceremoniously dismissed or terminated.
American Heritage
hook, line, and sinker
  • Without reservation; completely:

    swallowed the excuse hook, line, and sinker.

American Heritage
off the hook
  • Freed, as from blame or a vexatious obligation:

    let me off the hook with a mild reprimand.

American Heritage
on (one's) own hook
  • By one's own efforts.
American Heritage
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Other Word Forms of Hook

Noun

Singular:
hook
Plural:
hooks

Origin of Hook

  • From Middle English hoke, from Old English hōc, from Proto-Germanic *hōkaz (cf. West Frisian/Dutch hoek 'hook, angle, corner', Low German Hook, Huuk 'id.'), variant of *hakô (“hook”) (compare Dutch Low Saxon hoake (“hook”)). Probably ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *kog-, *keg-, *keng- (“peg, hook, claw”). More at hake.

    From Wiktionary

  • Middle English hok from Old English hōc keg- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

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