Slice meaning

slīs
A portion or share.

A slice of the profits.

noun
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To cut or divide into slices.

Slice a loaf of bread.

verb
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To cut from a larger piece.

Slice off a piece of salami.

verb
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To cut through or move through with an action like cutting.
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To divide into portions or shares; parcel out.
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To reduce or remove from a larger amount or entity.

Sliced 10 percent off the asking price.

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To hit (a ball) with a slice.
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To make a cut with a cutting implement.

I sliced into the cake.

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To move like a knife.

The destroyer sliced through the water.

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To hit a ball with a slice.
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A relatively thin, broad piece cut from an object having some bulk or volume.

A slice of apple.

noun
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A part, portion, or share.

A slice of one's earnings.

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Any of various implements with a flat, broad blade, as a spatula.
noun
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To cut into slices.
verb
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To separate into parts or shares.

Sliced up the profits.

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To use a slice to spread, remove, etc.
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To hit (a ball) in a slice.
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To hit (the ball) with a downward sweep of the racket.
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To cut (through) like a knife.

A plow slicing through the earth.

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That which is thin and broad.
noun
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A thin, broad piece cut off.

A slice of bacon; a slice of cheese; a slice of bread.

noun
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A piece of pizza.
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(UK) A snack consisting of pastry with savoury filling.

I bought a ham and cheese slice at the service station.

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A broad, thin piece of plaster.
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A knife with a thin, broad blade for taking up or serving fish; also, a spatula for spreading anything, as paint or ink.
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A plate of iron with a handle, forming a kind of chisel, or a spadelike implement, variously proportioned, and used for various purposes, as for stripping the planking from a vessel's side, for cutting blubber from a whale, or for stirring a fire of coals; a slice bar; a peel; a fire shovel.
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One of the wedges by which the cradle and the ship are lifted clear of the building blocks to prepare for launching.
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(printing) A removable sliding bottom to a galley.
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(golf) A shot that (for the right-handed player) curves unintentionally to the right. See fade, hook, draw.
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(Australia, New Zealand) A class of heavy cakes or desserts made in a tray and cut out into squarish slices.
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(medicine) A section of image taken of an internal organ using MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), CT (computed tomography), or various forms of x-ray.
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(falconry) A hawk's or falcon's dropping which squirts at an angle other than vertical. (See mute.)
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To cut into slices.

Slice the cheese thinly.

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To cut with an edge utilizing a drawing motion.

The knife left sliced his arm.

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(golf) To hit a shot that slices (travels from left to right for a right-handed player).
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(soccer)
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To clear (e.g. a fire, or the grate bars of a furnace) by means of a slice bar.
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any way
  • No matter how you look at it; no matter how it is analyzed.
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of slice

  • Middle English sclice splinter from Old French esclice from esclicier to splinter of Germanic origin
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English slice, esclice, from Old French esclice, esclis (“a piece split off"), deverbal of esclicer, esclicier (“to splinter, split up"), from Frankish *slitjan (“to split up"), from Proto-Germanic *slitjanÄ…, from Proto-Germanic *slÄ«tanÄ… (“to split, tear apart"), from Proto-Indo-European *slaid-, *sled- (“to rend, injure, crumble"). Akin to Old High German sliz, gisliz (“a tear, rip"), Old High German slÄ«zan (“to tear"), Old English slÄ«tan (“to split up"). More at slite, slit.
    From Wiktionary