Whole meaning

hōl
The definition of whole is something that is complete or the entire amount.

An example of whole is a whole pie, a pie without any pieces cut from it.

An example of whole is a being gone a whole year, being away from home for an entire year.

adjective
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An entity or system made up of interrelated parts.

The value of the whole was greater than the sum of its parts.

noun
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Having the same parents.

A whole sister.

adjective
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A number, group, set, or thing lacking no part or element; a complete thing.
noun
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Entirely; wholly.

A whole new idea.

adverb
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Not broken, damaged, defective, etc.; intact.

A whole yolk.

adjective
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Containing all the elements or parts; entire; complete.

A whole set, whole blood.

adjective
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Not divided up; in a single unit.

A whole cheese.

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Constituting the entire amount, extent, number, etc.

The whole night.

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Having both parents in common.

A whole brother.

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In all aspects of one's being, including the physical, mental, social, etc.

The whole man.

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Integral and not mixed or fractional.

28 is a whole number.

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Completely; absolutely.

A whole new ballgame.

adverb
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The entire amount, quantity, extent, or sum; totality.

The whole of the estate.

noun
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A thing complete in itself, or a complete organization of integrated parts; a unity, entirety, or system.
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I ate a whole fish.

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He is of whole mind, but the same cannot be said about his physical state.

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(of food) From which none of its constituents has been removed.

Whole wheat; whole milk.

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(colloquial) In entirety; entirely; wholly.

I ate a fish whole!

adverb
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Something complete, without any parts missing.
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noun
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as a whole
  • All parts or aspects considered; altogether:.
    Disliked the acting but enjoyed the play as a whole.
idiom
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on the whole
  • Considering everything:.
    On the whole, a happy marriage.
  • In most instances or cases; as a rule:.
    Can expect sunny weather, on the whole.
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as a whole
  • As a complete unit; altogether.
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a whole lot of
  • Very many.
    They ate a whole lot of hamburgers.
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made up out of whole cloth
  • Entirely imagined or fabricated; with no basis in fact.
idiom
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on the whole
  • All things considered; in general.
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of whole

  • Middle English hole unharmed from Old English hāl kailo- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English hool (“healthy, unhurt, whole"), from Old English hāl (“healthy, safe"), from Proto-Germanic *hailaz (“whole, safe, sound") (compare West Frisian hiel, Low German heel/heil, Dutch heel, German heil, Danish hel), from Proto-Indo-European *kóhâ‚‚ilus (“healthy, whole") (compare Welsh coel (“omen"), Breton kel (“omen, mention"), Old Prussian kails (“healthy"), Albanian gjallë (“alive, unhurt"), Old Church Slavonic цѣлъ (cÄ›lÅ­, “healthy, unhurt"). Related to hale, health, hail, and heal.

    From Wiktionary

  • The spelling with wh-, introduced in the 15th century, was for disambiguation with hole.

    From Wiktionary