Hale meaning

hāl
To compel to go.
verb
6
1
Sound in body; vigorous and healthy.
adjective
3
1
Free from infirmity or illness; sound.
adjective
2
0
The definition of hale is healthy or free from disease.

An example of hale used as an adjective is the phrase "he looks hearty and hale," which means a person who looks healthy.

adjective
1
0
To hale is defined as to force or push to go.

An example of to hale is to signal a horse to begin pulling a carriage.

verb
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(archaic) To pull forcibly; drag; haul.
verb
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To force (a person) to go.

Haled him into court.

verb
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(person) 1822-1909; U.S. clergyman & writer.
proper name
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(person) 1868-1938; U.S. astronomer.
proper name
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0
(person) 1755-76; Am. soldier in the Revolutionary War: hanged by the British as a spy.
proper name
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(archaic) Health, welfare.
noun
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Sound, entire, healthy; robust, not impaired.
adjective
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To drag, pull, especially forcibly.
verb
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0
anagrams
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anagrams
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pronoun
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(archaic) To pull, draw, drag, or hoist.
verb
0
1

Other Word Forms

Adjective

Base Form:
hale
Comparative
halest
Superlative
halest

Origin of hale

  • Middle English halen to pull, drag from Old French haler of Germanic origin kelə-2 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old English hāl kailo- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English halen, from Anglo-Norman haler, from Old Dutch *halon (compare Dutch halen), from Proto-Germanic *halōną (compare Old English geholian, West Frisian helje, German holen), from Proto-Indo-European *kelh₁- ‘to lift’ (compare Latin excellere ‘to surpass’, Tocharian B käly- ‘to stand, stay’, Albanian qell (“to halt, hold up, carry”), Lithuanian kélti ‘to raise up’, Ancient Greek κελέοντες (keléontes) ‘upright beam on a loom’). Doublet of haul.

    From Wiktionary

  • Representing a Northern dialectal form of Old English hāl (“whole”), perhaps influenced by Old Norse heill (Webster's suggests ‘partly from Old English, partly from Old Norse’), both from Proto-Germanic *hailaz, from Proto-Indo-European *kóh₂ilus (“healthy, whole”). Compare whole, hail (adjective).

    From Wiktionary

  • From Old English hǣlu, hǣl, from a noun-derivative of Proto-Germanic *hailaz (“whole, healthy”).

    From Wiktionary

  • Old English dative form of halh (“hollow, nook”)

    From Wiktionary