Some definition

sŭm
Being an unspecified number or quantity.

Some people came into the room. Would you like some sugar?

adjective
18
2
Unknown or unspecified by name.

Some man called.

adjective
17
3
(informal) Remarkable.

She is some skier.

adjective
13
4
(logic) Being part and perhaps all of a class.
adjective
10
2
An indefinite additional quantity.

Did the assigned work and then some.

pronoun
4
1
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An unspecified amount of (something uncountable).

Would you like some water?

determiner
2
0
The definition of some is an unknown or unspecified number of people or things.

An example of some is someone saying more than a couple of people are coming over for dinner.

adjective
1
1
Being a portion or an unspecified number or quantity of a whole or group.

He likes some modern sculpture but not all.

adjective
1
1
An indefinite or unspecified number or portion.

We took some of the books to the auction.

pronoun
1
1
(informal) To a great extent or at a great rate.

Must run some to catch up.

adverb
1
1
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Some is an indefinite or unspecified number.

An example of some used as a pronoun is to replace a name or quantity such as the phrase some children came to play.

pronoun
0
0
A certain number, at least one.

Some enjoy spicy food, others prefer it milder.

pronoun
0
0

Can I have some of them?

pronoun
0
0

Please give me some of the cake; everyone is wrong some of the time.

pronoun
0
0

Would you like some grapes?

determiner
0
0
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I've just met some guy who said he knew you. The sequence S converges to zero for some initial value v.

determiner
0
0
A considerable quantity or number of.

He had edited the paper for some years.

determiner
0
0
(informal) A remarkable.

He is some acrobat!

determiner
0
0
Of a measurement; approximately, roughly.

I guess he must have weighed some 90 kilos.

Some 30,000 spectators witnessed the feat.

Some 4,000 acres of land were flooded.

adverb
0
0
suffix
0
0
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Used to form a word indicating a group with a certain small number of members.
suffix
0
0
A body.
suffix
0
0
A chromosome.
suffix
0
0
Characterized by a specified quality, condition, or action.

Bothersome.

suffix
1
2
Being a considerable number or quantity.

She has been directing films for some years now.

adjective
1
3
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Approximately; about.

Some 40 people attended the rally.

adverb
0
2
A group of a specified number of members.

Threesome.

suffix
0
2
Body.

Centrosome.

suffix
0
2
Chromosome.

Monosome.

suffix
0
2
Being a certain one or ones not specified or known.

Open some evenings.

adjective
0
2
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Being of a certain unspecified (but often considerable) number, quantity, degree, etc.

To have some fear, married for some years.

adjective
0
2
About.

Some ten of them.

adjective
0
2
(informal) Remarkable, striking, etc.

It was some fight.

adjective
0
2
A certain indefinite or unspecified number, quantity, etc. as distinguished from the rest.

Take some.

pronoun
0
2
Approximately; about.

Some ten men.

adverb
0
2
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(informal) To some extent; somewhat.

Slept some.

adverb
0
2
Like, tending to, tending to be.

Toilsome, tiresome, lonesome.

affix
0
2
A group of (a specified number of) members.

Threesome.

affix
0
2
Body.

Chromosome.

affix
0
2
Chromosome.

Monosome.

affix
0
2
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(informal) Somewhat.

Some tired.

adverb
0
3
Certain ones not specified or known.

Some agree.

pronoun
0
3
and then some
  • and more than that
idiom
0
2

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of some

  • ME -som < OE -sum, akin to some

    From Webster's New World College Dictionary, 5th Edition

  • ME -sum < sum, som, some

    From Webster's New World College Dictionary, 5th Edition

  • < Gr sōma, body: see soma

    From Webster's New World College Dictionary, 5th Edition

  • Middle English -som from Old English -sum -like sem-1 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old English sum a certain one sem-1 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English -sum from Old English sum some some

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Greek sōma body teuə- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English some, sum, from Old English sum (“some, a certain one"), from Proto-Germanic *sumaz (“some, a certain one"), from Proto-Indo-European *sem- (“one, whole"). Cognate Scots sum, some (“some"), North Frisian som, sam, säm (“some"), West Frisian sommige, somlike (“some"), Low German sum (“some"), Dutch sommige (“some"), German dialectal summige (“some"), Danish somme (“some"), Swedish somlig (“some"), Norwegian sum, som (“some"), Icelandic sumur (“some"), Gothic 𐍃𐌿𐌼𐍃 (sums, “one, someone"). More at same.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English, from Old English -sum (“-some, same as"). Akin to Old Frisian -sum (“-some"), Old High German -sam (“-some"), Old Norse -samr (“-some"), Gothic -𐍃𐌰𐌼𐍃 (-sams), -𐍃𐌰𐌼𐌰 (-sama). Cognate with Albanian -shëm (“-some"). More at same.

    From Wiktionary

  • Middle English from a specialized note of Old English sum (“some, one") coming after a genitive plural (eg. hÄ“ wæs fÄ“owertiga sum --"he was one of forty", literally "he was forties' some[one]"; sixa sum --"one of six, sixsome").

    From Wiktionary

  • From Ancient Greek σῶμα (soma, “body")

    From Wiktionary