Broken definitions

brō'kən
The definition of broken is split, out of order, or not continuous.

An example of broken used as an adjective is the phrase "a broken home," which means a home where the father and mother are not living together.

An example of broken used as an adjective is the phrase "broken watch," which means a watch that is not keeping accurate time.

adjective
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Forcibly separated into two or more pieces; fractured.

A broken arm; broken glass.

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Sundered by divorce, separation, or desertion of a parent or parents.

Children from broken homes; a broken marriage.

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Having been violated.

A broken promise.

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Topographically rough; uneven.

Broken terrain.

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Crushed by grief.

Died of a broken heart.

adjective
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Financially ruined; bankrupt.
adjective
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Not functioning; out of order.

A broken washing machine.

adjective
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Incomplete.

A broken set of books.

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Being in a state of disarray; disordered.

Troops fleeing in broken ranks.

adjective
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Intermittently stopping and starting; discontinuous.

A broken cable transmission.

adjective
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Varying abruptly, as in pitch.

Broken sobs.

adjective
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Spoken with gaps and errors.

Broken English.

adjective
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Subdued totally; humbled.

A broken spirit.

adjective
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Weakened and infirm.

Broken health.

adjective
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verb
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Split or cracked into pieces; splintered, fractured, burst, etc.
adjective
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Not in working condition; out of order.

A broken watch.

adjective
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Not kept or observed; violated.

A broken promise.

adjective
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Disrupted, as by divorce.

A broken home.

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Sick, weakened, or beaten.

Broken health, a broken spirit.

adjective
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Bankrupt.
adjective
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Not even or continuous; interrupted.

Broken terrain, broken tones.

adjective
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Not complete.

A broken set of Shakespeare's works.

adjective
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Imperfectly spoken, esp. with reference to grammar and syntax.

Broken English.

adjective
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Subdued and trained; tamed.
adjective
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Demoted in rank.
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Not working properly. The term applies to software as well as hardware. If software is "broken," it means there is a bug in it. It may mean that people are having difficulty using it, because of poor design or cryptic error messages, in which case some parts of all software are "broken." See bug.
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Past participle of break.
verb
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Fragmented, in separate pieces.
  • (of a bone or body part) Fractured; having the bone in pieces.
    My arm is broken!.
    The ground was littered with broken bones.
  • (of skin) Split or ruptured.
    A dog bit my leg and now the skin is broken.
  • (of a line) Dashed, made up of short lines with small gaps between each one and the next.
  • (of sleep) Interrupted; not continuous.
  • (meteorology, of the sky) Five-eighths to seven-eighths obscured by clouds; incompletely covered by clouds.
    Tomorrow: broken skies.
adjective
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(of a promise, etc) Breeched; violated; not kept.

Broken promises of neutrality, broken vows, the broken covenant.

adjective
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Non-functional; not functioning properly.
  • (of an electronic connection) Disconnected, no longer open or carrying traffic.
  • (software, informal) Badly designed or implemented.
    This is the most broken application I've seen in a long time.
  • (pejorative, of language) Grammatically non-standard, especially as a result of being a non-native speaker.
  • (colloquial, US, of a situation) Not having gone in the way intended; saddening.
    Oh man! That is just broken!.

I think my doorbell broken.

adjective
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(of a person) Completely defeated and dispirited; shattered; destroyed.

The bankruptcy and divorce, together with the death of his son, left him completely broken.

adjective
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Having no money; bankrupt, broke.

Uneven.

adjective
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(sports and gaming, of a tactic or option) Overpowered; overly powerful; too powerful.
adjective
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(pejorative, politically incorrect) Torres Strait Creole.
pronoun
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Origin of broken

Back-formation from broken English.