Complete meaning

kəm-plēt'
To throw (a forward pass) that is caught in bounds by a receiver.
verb
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To complete is to finish something, to make something whole or see a task through to the end.

An example of complete is when you finish your homework.

verb
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Successfully executed.
adjective
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1
Having all principal parts, namely, the sepals, petals, stamens, and pistil or pistils. Used of a flower.
adjective
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1
The definition of complete is someone or something that is finished or whole and that is not missing anything or any parts.

An example of complete is a finished puzzle that has all 100 pieces.

adjective
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Having all necessary or normal parts, components, or steps; entire.

A complete medical history; a complete set of dishes.

adjective
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Having come to an end; concluded.

The renovation of the kitchen is complete.

adjective
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Caught in bounds by a receiver.

A complete pass.

adjective
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To bring to a finish or an end.

She has completed her studies.

verb
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To make whole, with all necessary elements or parts.

A second child would complete their family. Fill in the blanks to complete the form.

verb
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Lacking no component part; full; whole; entire.
adjective
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Brought to a conclusion; ended; finished.
adjective
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Thorough; absolute.

To have complete confidence in someone.

adjective
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Accomplished; skilled; consummate.
adjective
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To end; finish; conclude.
verb
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To make whole, full, or perfect.
verb
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To successfully execute or effect.

To complete a telephone call, complete a forward pass.

verb
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To finish; to make done; to reach the end.

He completed the assignment on time.

verb
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To make whole or entire.

The last chapter completes the book nicely.

verb
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With all parts included; with nothing missing; full.

My life will be complete once I buy this new television.

She offered me complete control of the project.

After she found the rook, the chess set was complete.

adjective
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Finished; ended; concluded; completed.

When your homework is complete, you can go and play with Martin.

adjective
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Generic intensifier.

He is a complete bastard!

It was a complete shock when he turned up on my doorstep.

Our vacation was a complete disaster.

adjective
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(analysis, Of a metric space) In which every Cauchy sequence converges.
adjective
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(algebra, Of a lattice) In which every set with a lower bound has a greatest lower bound.
adjective
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(mathematics, Of a category) In which all small limits exist.
adjective
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(logic, of a proof system of a formal system) With respect to a given semantics, that any well-formed formula which is (semantically) valid must also be provable.
adjective
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complete with
  • Including; along with.
    The new house comes complete with a built-in pool.
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of complete

  • Middle English complet from Latin complētus past participle of complēre to fill out com- intensive pref. com– plēre to fill pelə-1 in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English compleet (“full, complete”), from Old French complet or Latin completus, past participle of complere (“to fill up, fill full, fulfil, complete”), from com- + *plere (“to fill”), akin to full: see full and plenty and compare deplete, replete. Compare also complement, compliment.
    From Wiktionary