Full meaning

fo͝ol
Containing all that is normal or possible.

A full pail.

adjective
10
2
Complete in every particular.

A full account.

adjective
7
0
To a complete extent; entirely.

Knowing full well.

adverb
6
1
Completely absorbed or preoccupied.
adjective
5
2
Having depth and body; rich.

A full aroma; full tones.

adjective
5
3
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To the greatest degree; completely; fully.

A full-grown boy.

adverb
4
0
Very.

Full well.

adverb
4
2
Exactly; directly.

Full in the path of the moon.

adverb
3
0
To make (a garment) full, as by pleating or gathering.
verb
3
0
To become full. Used of the moon.
verb
3
0
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To increase the density and usually the thickness of (cloth) by shrinking and beating or pressing.
verb
3
0
The maximum or complete size or amount.

Repaid in full.

noun
2
0
The highest degree or state.

Living life to the full.

noun
2
0
Having in it all there is space for; holding or containing as much as possible; filled.

A full jar.

adjective
2
0
Having a great deal or number (of); crowded.

A room full of people.

adjective
2
0
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Having the same parents.

Full brothers.

adjective
2
0
The greatest amount, extent, number, size, etc.

To enjoy life to the full.

noun
2
0
Directly; exactly.

To be hit full in the face.

adverb
2
0
To sew loose folds into (a skirt); gather.
verb
2
0
To become full.
verb
2
0
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To shrink and thicken (cloth, esp. wool) with moisture, heat, and pressure.
verb
2
0
Having a great deal or many.

A book full of errors.

adjective
1
0
Totally qualified, accepted, or empowered.

A full member of the club.

adjective
1
0
Possessing both parents in common.

Full brothers; full sisters.

adjective
1
0
Using or occupying all of a given space.

A full load.

adjective
1
0
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Having clearness, volume, and depth.

A full tone.

adjective
1
0
Plump; round; filled out.

A full face.

adjective
1
0
With loose, wide folds; ample; flowing.

A full skirt.

adjective
1
0
The definition of full is someone or something that has reached its limit.

An example of full is someone eating until they are no longer hungry.

An example of full is an eight person vehicle carrying eight people.

adjective
0
0
Containing the maximum possible amount of that which can fit in the space available.

The jugs were full to the point of overflowing.

adjective
0
0
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Complete; with nothing omitted.

Our book gives full treatment to the subject of angling.

adjective
0
0
Total, entire.

She had tattoos the full length of her arms. He was prosecuted to the full extent of the law.

adjective
0
0
(informal) Having eaten to satisfaction, having a "full" stomach; replete.

"I'm full," he said, pushing back from the table.

adjective
0
0
Of a garment, of a size that is ample, wide, or having ample folds or pleats to be comfortable.

A full pleated skirt; She needed her full clothing during her pregnancy.

adjective
0
0
Having depth and body; rich.

A full singing voice.

adjective
0
0
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Having the attention, thoughts, etc., absorbed in any matter, and the feelings more or less excited by it.

She's full of her latest project.

adjective
0
0
Filled with emotions.
adjective
0
0
adverb
0
0
Utmost measure or extent; highest state or degree; the state, position, or moment of fullness; fill.
  • 1911, Berthold Auerbach, Bayard Taylor, The villa on the Rhine.
    […] he had tasted their food, and found it so palatable that he had eaten his full before he knew it.
  • 2008, Jay Cassell, The Gigantic Book Of Hunting Stories.
    Early next morning we were over at the elk carcass, and, as we expected, found that the bear had eaten his full at it during the night.
  • 2010, C. E. Morgan, All the Living: A Novel.
    When he had eaten his full, they set to work again.

I was fed to the full.

noun
0
0
(of the moon) The phase of the moon when it is entire face is illuminated, full moon.
noun
0
0
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(freestyle skiing) An aerialist maneuver consisting of a backflip in conjunction and simultaneous with a complete twist.
noun
0
0
(of the moon) To become full or wholly illuminated.
verb
0
0
verb
0
0
verb
0
0
at the full
  • at the state or time of fullness
idiom
1
0
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in full
  • to, for, or with the full amount, value, etc.
  • with all the words or letters; not abbreviated or condensed
idiom
1
0

Other Word Forms

Adjective

Base Form:
full
Comparative
full·er1
Superlative
fullest

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

at the full

Origin of full

  • Middle English fullen from Old French fouler from Vulgar Latin fullāre from Latin fullō fuller bhel-2 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English ful from Old English full pelə-1 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English fulle, fylle, fille, from Old English fyllu, fyllo (“fullness, fill, plenty”), from Proto-Germanic *fullį̄, *fulnō (“fullness, filling, overflow”), from Proto-Indo-European *plūno-, *plno- (“full”), from Proto-Indo-European *pelǝ-, *plē- (“to fill; full”). Cognate with German Fülle (“fullness, fill”), Icelandic fylli (“fulness, fill”). More at fill.

    From Wiktionary

  • Germanic cognates include West Frisian fol, Low German vull, Dutch vol, German voll, Danish fuld, and Swedish and Norwegian full (the latter three via Old Norse). Proto-Indo-European cognates include English plenty (via Latin, cf. plenus), Welsh llawn, Russian полный (pólnyj), Lithuanian pilnas, Persian پر (p), Sanskrit पूर्ण (pūrṇa). See also fele.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English fullen, fulwen, from Old English fullian, fulwian (“to baptise”), from Proto-Germanic *fullawīhōną (“to fully consecrate”), from Proto-Germanic *fulla- (“full-”) + Proto-Germanic *wīhōną (“to hallow, consecrate, make holy”). Compare Old English fulluht, fulwiht (“baptism”).

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English full, from Old English full (“full”), from Proto-Germanic *fullaz (“full”), from Proto-Indo-European *pl̥h₁nós (“full”).

    From Wiktionary

  • Middle English, from Old French fuller, fouler (“to tread, to stamp, to full”), from Medieval Latin fullare, from Latin fullo (“a fuller”)

    From Wiktionary