Complement meaning

kŏmplə-mənt
Complement means to make something complete.

An example of complement is to add jewelry to a dress to finish the look.

verb
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The definition of a complement is something that makes something else complete.

An example of complement is a set of jewelry that makes an outfit look finished.

noun
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(music) An interval that completes an octave when added to a given interval.
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(mathematics & logic) For a universal set, the set of all elements in the set that are not in a specified subset.
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(grammar) A word or words used to complete a predicate construction, especially the object or indirect object of a verb, for example, the phrase to eat ice cream in We like to eat ice cream.
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A complete set; entirety.
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An angle related to another so that the sum of their measures is 90°.
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A complementary color.
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To serve as a complement to.

Roses in a silver bowl complement the handsome cherry table.

verb
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Something that completes or enhances something else.

The wine was a fine complement to the meal.

noun
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The amount or number needed to fill or complete.
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Something added to complete a whole; either of two parts that complete each other.
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(gram.) A word or group of words that, with the verb, completes the meaning and syntactic structure of the predicate (Ex.: foreman in “make him foreman,” paid in “he expects to get paid”)
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(immunology) A complex series of proteins in the blood plasma that acts with specific antibodies to destroy corresponding antigens, as bacteria or foreign proteins.
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(music) The difference between a given interval and the complete octave.
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(naut.) All of a ship's personnel, including the officers, required to operate a ship.
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To be a complement to.

A colorful scarf will complement the black dress.

verb
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A complex system of proteins found in blood plasma that are sequentially activated and play various roles in the immune response, including lysing bacterial cell membranes, making pathogens more susceptible to phagocytes, and recruiting inflammatory cells to sites of infection or injury.
noun
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A group of proteins in blood serum that interact systematically as part of the body's immune response to destroy disease-causing antigens, especially bacteria. Complement proteins interact with antibodies and other chemical substances to cause the disintegration of foreign cells and enhance other immune functions such as phagocytosis.
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The number derived by subtracting a number from a base number. For example, the tens complement of 8 is 2. In set theory, complement refers to all the objects in one set that are not in another set.Complements are used in digital circuits, because it is faster to subtract by adding complements than by performing true subtraction. The binary complement of a number is created by reversing all bits and adding 1. The carry from the high-order position is eliminated. The following example subtracts 5 from 8.Decimal Binary Complement 8 1000 1000 -5 -0101 +1011 __ _____ _____ 3 0011 0011
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(now rare) Something (someone) that completes; the consummation. [from 14th c.]
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The totality, the full amount or number which completes something. [from 16th c.]
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Spenser.

Without vain art or curious complements.

noun
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(nautical) The whole working force of a vessel.
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(heraldry) Fullness (of the moon). [from 17th c.]
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(astronomy, geometry) An angle which, together with a given angle, makes a right angle. [from 18th c.]
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Something which completes, something which combines with something else to make up a complete whole; loosely, something perceived to be a harmonious or desirable partner or addition. [from 19th c.]
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(grammar) A word or group of words that completes a grammatical construction in the predicate and that describes or is identified with the subject or object. [from 19th c.]
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(music) An interval which, together with the given interval, makes an octave. [from 19th c.]
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(optics) The color which, when mixed with the given color, gives black (for mixing pigments) or white (for mixing light). [from 19th c.]

The complement of blue is orange.

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(set theory) Given two sets, the set containing one set's elements that are not members of the other set (whether a relative complement or an absolute complement). [from 20th c.]

The complement of the odd numbers is the even numbers, relative to the natural numbers.

noun
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(immunology) One of several blood proteins that work with antibodies during an immune response. [from 20th c.]
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(logic) An expression related to some other expression such that it is true under the same conditions that make other false, and vice versa. [from 20th c.]
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(electronics) A voltage level with the opposite logical sense to the given one.
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(computing) A bit with the opposite value to the given one; the logical complement of a number.
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(computing, mathematics) The diminished radix complement of a number; the nines' complement of a decimal number; the ones' complement of a binary number.

The complement of is .

noun
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(computing, mathematics) The radix complement of a number; the two's complement of a binary number.

The complement of is .

noun
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(computing, mathematics) The numeric complement of a number.

The complement of -123 is 123.

noun
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(genetics) A nucleotide sequence in which each base is replaced by the complementary base of the given sequence: adenine (A) by thymine (T) or uracil (U), cytosine (C) by guanine (G), and vice versa.

A DNA molecule is formed from two strands, each of which is the complement of the other.

noun
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To complete, to bring to perfection, to make whole.

We believe your addition will complement the team.

verb
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To provide what the partner lacks and lack what the partner provides.

The flavors of the pepper and garlic complement each other, giving a very rich taste in combination.

I believe our talents really complement each other.

verb
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To change a voltage, number, color, etc. to its complement.
verb
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(immunology) A complex system of proteins found in normal blood plasma that combines with antibodies to destroy pathogenic bacteria and other foreign cells.
noun
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A complementary color.
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Origin of complement

  • Middle English from Old French from Latin complēmentum from complēre to fill out complete

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old French, from Latin complementum (“that which fills up or completes”), from complere (“to fill up, complete”).

    From Wiktionary