Obverse meaning

ŏb-vûrs, əb-, ŏbvûrs
The side of a coin, medal, or badge that bears the principal stamp or design.
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The more conspicuous of two possible alternatives, cases, or sides.

The obverse of this issue.

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The counterpart of a proposition obtained by exchanging the affirmative for the negative quality of the whole proposition and then negating the predicate.

The obverse of “Every act is predictable” is “No act is unpredictable.”

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Turned toward the observer.
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Narrower at the base than at the top.

An obverse leaf.

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Forming a counterpart.
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The side, as of a coin or medal, bearing the date and the main image or design.
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The front or main surface of anything.
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The negative counterpart of an affirmative proposition, or the affirmative counterpart of a negative.

“no one is infallible” is the obverse of “everyone is fallible”

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Turned or facing toward the observer.

The obverse side of the gravestone has the inscription.

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When you speak clearly, people understand you. If you don't mumble, the obverse effect is observed.

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(botany) Having the base, or end next to the attachment, narrower than the top.

An obverse leaf.

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The heads side of a coin, or the side of a medal or badge that has the principal design.

The medal had a cross on the obverse and had a name inscribed on the reverse.

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(logic) The double negative of a statement e.g. All men are mortal => No man is immortal.
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Facing or turned toward the observer.

The obverse side of a statue.

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Serving as a counterpart or complement.
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A counterpart.
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Origin of obverse

  • Latin obversus past participle of obvertere to turn toward obvert

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Latin obversus.

    From Wiktionary