Gang definition

găng
The definition of a gang is a group of people who spend a lot of time together, often for negative purposes such as stealing or attacking others.

An example of a gang is a group of youths who frequently rob stores and beat up others.

noun
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A group of criminals or hoodlums who band together for mutual protection and profit.
noun
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To band together as a group or gang.
verb
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A group of adolescents who band together, especially a group of delinquents.
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(informal) A group of people who associate regularly on a social basis.

The whole gang from the office went to a clambake.

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A group of laborers organized together on one job or under one foreperson.

A railroad gang.

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A matched or coordinated set, as of tools.

A gang of chisels.

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A pack of wolves or wild dogs.
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A herd, especially of buffalo or elk.
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To arrange or assemble into a group, as for simultaneous operation or production.

Gang several pages onto one printing plate.

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To attack as an organized group.
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A group of people associated together in some way.
  • A group of workers directed by a foreman.
  • An organized group of criminals.
  • A squad of convicts at work.
  • A group of youths from one neighborhood banded together for social reasons; often specif., a band of juvenile delinquents.
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A set of like tools, machines, components, etc., designed or arranged to work together.

Gang drills.

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A very large number of persons or things.
noun
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To form, or be associated in, a gang (with up)
verb
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(informal) To attack as a gang.
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To arrange in a gang, or coordinated set.
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(scot.) To go or work.
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Some of the first crackers to become famous in the Black Hat way were Ronald Mark Austin and the members of the 414-gang. Based in Milwaukee, the gang started cracking remote computers as early as 1980. It was the 1983 discovery of their exploits—as noted in the movie War Games of 1983—that sparked global debate and anxieties about crackers and their abilities to compromise computer system security. Their story goes like this: After they exploited a New York cancer hospital’s network, the 414-gang erased (supposedly by accident) a hospital file’s content as they were attempting to hide the traces of their exploits into the computer. The file was completely destroyed. As a result of this crack, the New York cancer hospital as well as U.S. companies and government agencies began to fear that confidential files are at continual risk of being intruded upon and being destroyed. As an aside, after the 414-gang became famous, most hackers and crackers developed a liking for adding numbers either before or after their names, or for using a completely new handle such as Mafiaboy as an online identifier. Schell, B.H., Dodge, J.L., with S.S. Moutsatsos. The Hacking of America: Who’s Doing It, Why, and How. Westport, CT: Quorum Books, 2002.
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(intransitive, chiefly UK dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) To go; walk; proceed.
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(now chiefly dialectal) A going, journey; a course, path, track.
noun
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A number going in company; a number of friends or persons associated for a particular purpose.

The Gashouse Gang.

The gang from our office is going out for drinks Friday night.

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A group of laborers under one foreman; a squad.

A gang of sailors; a railroad gang.

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(US) A criminal group with a common cultural background and identifying features, often associated with a particular section of a city.

A youth gang; a neighborhood gang; motorcycle gang.

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A group of criminals or alleged criminals who band together for mutual protection and profit, or a group of politicians united in furtherance of a political goal.

The Winter Hill gang; the Gang of Four.

Not all members of the Gang of Six are consistent in their opposition to filibuster.

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(US) A chain gang.
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A combination of similar tools or implements arranged so as, by acting together, to save time or labor; a set.

A gang of saws; a gang of plows.

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A set; all required for an outfit.

A new gang of stays.

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(electrics) A number of switches or other electrical devices wired into one unit and covered by one faceplate.

An outlet gang box; a double gang switch.

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(electrics) A group of wires attached as a bundle.

A gang of wires.

Do a drop for the telephone gang, then another drop for the internet gang, both through the ceiling of the wiring closet.

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(mining) The mineral substance which encloses a vein; a matrix; a gangue.
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(intransitive) To band together as a group or gang.

"Let's gang up on them."

verb
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Eye dialect spelling of gan.
verb
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gang up on
  • to attack or oppose as a group
idiom
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
gang
Plural:
gangs

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of gang

  • Middle English band of men from Old English journey and Old Norse -gangr journey, group (as in thjofagangr gang of thieves)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English gangen, from Old English gangan (“to go, walk, turn out”), from Proto-Germanic *ganganą (“to go, walk”), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰengʰ- (“to step, walk”). Cognate with Scots gang (“to go on foot, walk”), Swedish gånga (“to walk, go”), Faroese ganga (“to walk”), Icelandic ganga (“to walk, go”). Ultimately: related to etym. 2, see below.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English gang, from Old English gang (“a journey, a way, a passage”), from Proto-Germanic *gangaz. Cognate with Dutch gang, Icelandic gangur, Norwegian gang ("hallway"), Old Norse gangr (passage, hallway).

    From Wiktionary

  • See gan.

    From Wiktionary