Crew definition

kro͝o
noun
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A group of people working together; a gang.

A crew of stagehands.

noun
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To serve (on) as the crew or a crew member.
verb
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All personnel operating or serving aboard a ship.
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The definition of a crew is a group of people working together, usually under a leader.

An example of a crew is the people hired to repair a road.

An example of a crew is the staff on a cruise ship.

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(slang) A group of people, especially friends or associates.
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All of a ship's personnel except the officers.
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All personnel operating or serving aboard an aircraft in flight.
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A team of rowers, as of a racing shell.
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The sport of rowing.
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(archaic) An organized band of armed men.
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All of a ship's personnel, usually excepting the officers.
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On a small sailboat, the person or persons who assist the helmsman, as by handling the sails.
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A rowing team for a racing shell, usually of two, four, six, or eight oarsmen with or without a coxswain.
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The sport of rowing racing shells.
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A group of people (often staff) manning and operating a large facility or piece of equipment such as a factory, ship, boat, or airplane.

If you need help, please contact a member of the crew.

The crews of the two ships got into a fight.

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(plural: crew) A member of the crew of a vessel or plant.

One crew died in the accident.

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Milton.

Faithful to whom? to thy rebellious crew?

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(nautical, plural: crew) A member of a ship's company who is not an officer.

The officers and crew assembled on the deck.

There are quarters for three officers and five crew.

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(art) The group of workers on a dramatic production who are not part of the cast.

There are a lot of carpenters in the crew!

The crews for different movies would all come down to the bar at night.

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(art, plural: crew) A worker on a dramatic production who is not part of the cast.

There were three actors and six crew on the set.

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A group of people working together on a task.

The crews competed to cut the most timber.

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(informal, often derogatory) A close group of friends.

I'd look out for that whole crew down at Jack's.

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(often derogatory) A set of individuals lumped together by the speaker.
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(slang, hip-hop) A hip-hop group.
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(sports, rowing, uncountable) The sport of competitive rowing.
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(rowing) A rowing team manning a single shell.
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( intransitive) To be a member of a vessel's crew.

We crewed together on a fishing boat last year.

The ship was crewed by fifty sailors.

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To be a member of a work or production crew.

The film was crewed and directed by students.

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To supply workers or sailors for a crew.
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(nautical) To do the proper work of a sailor.

The crewing of the vessel before the crash was deficient.

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(nautical) To take on, recruit (new) crew.
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(UK) Simple past tense and past participle of crow To have made the characteristic sound of a rooster.

It was still dark when the cock crew.

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(UK, dialectal) A pen for livestock such as chickens or pigs.
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The Manx shearwater.
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Crew is defined as a sport of racing boats with oars, also called rowing.

An example of crew is the sport someone participates in if they row long boats in competition.

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To serve as a member of a crew.

Crewed on a sloop.

verb
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To serve as a crew member on.

The space station will be crewed by a team of eight people.

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A group of people associating or classed together; company, set, gang, etc.
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A group of people working together, usually under the direction of a foreman or leader.

A road crew, gun crew.

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verb
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
crew
Plural:
crews

Origin of crew

  • Middle English creue military reinforcement from Old French increase from feminine past participle of creistre to grow from Latin crēscere ker-2 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • from Middle English, from Old French creue (“an increase, recruit, military reinforcement”), the feminine past participle of creistre (“grow”), from Latin crescere (“to arise, grow”)

    From Wiktionary

  • Probably of Brythonic origin.

    From Wiktionary